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The interplay of demography and selection during maize domestication and expansion

Overview of attention for article published in Genome Biology (Online Edition), November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
twitter
82 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
113 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
158 Mendeley
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Title
The interplay of demography and selection during maize domestication and expansion
Published in
Genome Biology (Online Edition), November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13059-017-1346-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Li Wang, Timothy M. Beissinger, Anne Lorant, Claudia Ross-Ibarra, Jeffrey Ross-Ibarra, Matthew B. Hufford

Abstract

The history of maize has been characterized by major demographic events, including population size changes associated with domestication and range expansion, and gene flow with wild relatives. The interplay between demographic history and selection has shaped diversity across maize populations and genomes. We investigate these processes using high-depth resequencing data from 31 maize landraces spanning the pre-Columbian distribution of maize, and four wild teosinte individuals (Zea mays ssp. parviglumis). Genome-wide demographic analyses reveal that maize experienced pronounced declines in effective population size due to both a protracted domestication bottleneck and serial founder effects during post-domestication spread, while parviglumis in the Balsas River Valley experienced population growth. The domestication bottleneck and subsequent spread led to an increase in deleterious alleles in the domesticate compared to the wild progenitor. This cost is particularly pronounced in Andean maize, which has experienced a more dramatic founder event compared to other maize populations. Additionally, we detect introgression from the wild teosinte Zea mays ssp. mexicana into maize in the highlands of Mexico, Guatemala, and the southwestern USA, which reduces the prevalence of deleterious alleles likely due to the higher long-term effective population size of teosinte. These findings underscore the strong interaction between historical demography and the efficiency of selection and illustrate how domesticated species are particularly useful for understanding these processes. The landscape of deleterious alleles and therefore evolutionary potential is clearly influenced by recent demography, a factor that could bear importantly on many species that have experienced recent demographic shifts.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 82 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 158 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 158 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 52 33%
Researcher 31 20%
Student > Master 17 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 6%
Student > Bachelor 6 4%
Other 13 8%
Unknown 30 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 98 62%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 19 12%
Environmental Science 3 2%
Social Sciences 2 1%
Arts and Humanities 1 <1%
Other 3 2%
Unknown 32 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 74. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 August 2020.
All research outputs
#402,913
of 19,960,113 outputs
Outputs from Genome Biology (Online Edition)
#296
of 3,891 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,789
of 333,140 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genome Biology (Online Edition)
#33
of 241 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,960,113 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,891 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 26.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 333,140 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 241 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.