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Proteins and amino acids are fundamental to optimal nutrition support in critically ill patients

Overview of attention for article published in Critical Care, November 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
11 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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72 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
201 Mendeley
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Title
Proteins and amino acids are fundamental to optimal nutrition support in critically ill patients
Published in
Critical Care, November 2014
DOI 10.1186/s13054-014-0591-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Peter JM Weijs, Luc Cynober, Mark DeLegge, Georg Kreymann, Jan Wernerman, Robert R Wolfe

Abstract

Proteins and amino acids are widely considered to be subcomponents in nutritional support. However, proteins and amino acids are fundamental to recovery and survival, not only for their ability to preserve active tissue (protein) mass but also for a variety of other functions. Understanding the optimal amount of protein intake during nutritional support is therefore fundamental to appropriate clinical care. Although the body adapts in some ways to starvation, metabolic stress in patients causes increased protein turnover and loss of lean body mass. In this review, we present the growing scientific evidence showing the importance of protein and amino acid provision in nutritional support and their impact on preservation of muscle mass and patient outcomes. Studies identifying optimal dosing for proteins and amino acids are not currently available. We discuss the challenges physicians face in administering the optimal amount of protein and amino acids. We present protein-related nutrition concepts, including adaptation to starvation and stress, anabolic resistance, and potential adverse effects of amino acid provision. We describe the methods for assessment of protein status, and outcomes related to protein nutritional support for critically ill patients. The identification of a protein target for individual critically ill patients is crucial for outcomes, particularly for specific subpopulations, such as obese and older patients. Additional research is urgently needed to address these issues.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 201 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
New Zealand 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Unknown 192 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 33 16%
Student > Master 28 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 10%
Researcher 18 9%
Student > Postgraduate 13 6%
Other 48 24%
Unknown 40 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 77 38%
Nursing and Health Professions 30 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 7%
Engineering 6 3%
Chemistry 5 2%
Other 20 10%
Unknown 49 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 November 2020.
All research outputs
#2,057,340
of 21,666,161 outputs
Outputs from Critical Care
#1,828
of 5,858 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#32,590
of 347,812 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Care
#29
of 145 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,666,161 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,858 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 347,812 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 145 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.