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Long-term balancing selection contributes to adaptation in Arabidopsis and its relatives

Overview of attention for article published in Genome Biology (Online Edition), November 2017
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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12 tweeters

Citations

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32 Dimensions

Readers on

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85 Mendeley
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Title
Long-term balancing selection contributes to adaptation in Arabidopsis and its relatives
Published in
Genome Biology (Online Edition), November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13059-017-1342-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Qiong Wu, Ting-Shen Han, Xi Chen, Jia-Fu Chen, Yu-Pan Zou, Zi-Wen Li, Yong-Chao Xu, Ya-Long Guo

Abstract

In contrast to positive selection, which reduces genetic variation by fixing beneficial alleles, balancing selection maintains genetic variation within a population or species and plays crucial roles in adaptation in diverse organisms. However, which genes, genome-wide, are under balancing selection and the extent to which these genes are involved in adaptation are largely unknown. We performed a genome-wide scan for genes under balancing selection across two plant species, Arabidopsis thaliana and its relative Capsella rubella, which diverged about 8 million generations ago. Among hundreds of genes with shared coding-region polymorphisms, we find evidence for long-term balancing selection in five genes: AT1G35220, AT2G16570, AT4G29360, AT5G38460, and AT5G44000. These genes are involved in the response to biotic and abiotic stress and other fundamental biochemical processes. More intriguingly, for these genes, we detected significant ecological diversification between the two haplotype groups, suggesting that balancing selection has been very important for adaptation. Our results indicate that beyond the well-known S-locus genes and resistance genes, many loci are under balancing selection. These genes are mostly correlated with resistance to stress or other fundamental functions and likely play a more important role in adaptation to diverse habitats than previously thought.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 85 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 85 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 20 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 21%
Student > Master 7 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 6%
Student > Bachelor 5 6%
Other 12 14%
Unknown 18 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 47 55%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 17 20%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 1%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 1%
Unknown 19 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 November 2017.
All research outputs
#3,910,986
of 19,499,600 outputs
Outputs from Genome Biology (Online Edition)
#2,424
of 3,843 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#72,658
of 279,546 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genome Biology (Online Edition)
#195
of 241 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,499,600 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 79th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,843 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 26.9. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 279,546 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 241 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.