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Implications of human genome structural heterogeneity: functionally related genes tend to reside in organizationally similar genomic regions

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, March 2014
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1 tweeter

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Title
Implications of human genome structural heterogeneity: functionally related genes tend to reside in organizationally similar genomic regions
Published in
BMC Genomics, March 2014
DOI 10.1186/1471-2164-15-252
Pubmed ID
Authors

Arnon Paz, Svetlana Frenkel, Sagi Snir, Valery Kirzhner, Abraham B Korol

Abstract

In an earlier study, we hypothesized that genomic segments with different sequence organization patterns (OPs) might display functional specificity despite their similar GC content. Here we tested this hypothesis by dividing the human genome into 100 kb segments, classifying these segments into five compositional groups according to GC content, and then characterizing each segment within the five groups by oligonucleotide counting (k-mer analysis; also referred to as compositional spectrum analysis, or CSA), to examine the distribution of sequence OPs in the segments. We performed the CSA on the entire DNA, i.e., its coding and non-coding parts the latter being much more abundant in the genome than the former.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Israel 1 4%
United States 1 4%
Turkey 1 4%
Netherlands 1 4%
Unknown 20 83%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 25%
Student > Bachelor 3 13%
Student > Master 3 13%
Student > Postgraduate 2 8%
Other 2 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 42%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 25%
Computer Science 3 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 8%
Social Sciences 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 1 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 November 2014.
All research outputs
#10,995,843
of 12,373,620 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#6,415
of 7,313 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#221,351
of 272,891 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#259
of 283 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 7,313 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 283 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.