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Minimization of extracellular space as a driving force in prokaryote association and the origin of eukaryotes.

Overview of attention for article published in Biology Direct, November 2014
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  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
36 Mendeley
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Title
Minimization of extracellular space as a driving force in prokaryote association and the origin of eukaryotes.
Published in
Biology Direct, November 2014
DOI 10.1186/1745-6150-9-24
Pubmed ID
Abstract

Internalization-based hypotheses of eukaryotic origin require close physical association of host and symbiont. Prior hypotheses of how these associations arose include chance, specific metabolic couplings between partners, and prey-predator/parasite interactions. Since these hypotheses were proposed, it has become apparent that mixed-species, close-association assemblages (biofilms) are widespread and predominant components of prokaryotic ecology. Which forces drove prokaryotes to evolve the ability to form these assemblages are uncertain. Bacteria and archaea have also been found to form membrane-lined interconnections (nanotubes) through which proteins and RNA pass. These observations, combined with the structure of the nuclear envelope and an energetic benefit of close association (see below), lead us to propose a novel hypothesis of the driving force underlying prokaryotic close association and the origin of eukaryotes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Chile 1 3%
United States 1 3%
Czechia 1 3%
Germany 1 3%
Unknown 32 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 31%
Researcher 5 14%
Student > Postgraduate 4 11%
Student > Master 4 11%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Other 8 22%
Unknown 1 3%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 53%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 19%
Environmental Science 1 3%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 3%
Computer Science 1 3%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 5 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 November 2014.
All research outputs
#13,030,149
of 21,321,365 outputs
Outputs from Biology Direct
#320
of 467 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#173,573
of 346,251 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biology Direct
#12
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,321,365 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 467 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.9. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 346,251 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.