↓ Skip to main content

Polymorphisms at microRNA binding sites of Ara-C and anthracyclines-metabolic pathway genes are associated with outcome of acute myeloid leukemia patients

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Translational Medicine, November 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
28 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Polymorphisms at microRNA binding sites of Ara-C and anthracyclines-metabolic pathway genes are associated with outcome of acute myeloid leukemia patients
Published in
Journal of Translational Medicine, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12967-017-1339-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hai-xia Cao, Chao-feng Miao, Liang Yan, Ping Tang, Li-rong Zhang, Ling Sun

Abstract

Gene polymorphisms at microRNA-binding sites (poly-miRTS) may affect gene transcription and expression through miRNA regulation, which is associated with cancer susceptibility, sensitivity to chemotherapy and prognosis. This study investigated the association between poly-miRTS of Ara-C/anthracycline metabolic pathways genes and the outcome of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in Chinese patients after Ara-C-based chemotherapy. A total of 17 poly-miRTS were selected from the SNPinfo Web Server and genotyped in 206 Chinese Han non-FAB-M3 AML patients using the SEQUENOM Mass-ARRAY system. Among these 17 poly-miRTS, five Ara-C metabolic gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, NT5C2 rs10786736 and rs8139, SLC29A1 rs3734703, DCTD rs7278, and RRM1 rs1042919) were identified to significantly associate with complete AML remission and/or overall and relapse-free survival (OS and RFS, respectively), and four anthracycline-metabolic gene SNPs (ABCC1 rs3743527, rs212091, and rs212090 and CBR1 rs9024) were significantly associated with chemotherapy-related toxicities. Moreover, SLC29A1 rs3734703 was shown to associate with both chemotherapy response and survival (adjusted OR 2.561 in the overdominant model; adjusted HR 2.876 for OS and 2.357 for RFS in the dominant model). The data from the current study demonstrated that the poly-miRTS of Ara-C/anthracyclines metabolic genes predicted the sensitivity and side effects of AML to Ara-C-based chemotherapy and patient survival. Further study will confirm them as biomarkers for AML patients after Ara-C-based chemotherapy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 28 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 18%
Student > Bachelor 3 11%
Other 2 7%
Student > Postgraduate 2 7%
Other 5 18%
Unknown 4 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 6 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 7%
Environmental Science 1 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Other 5 18%
Unknown 7 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 April 2021.
All research outputs
#3,269,722
of 20,952,553 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Translational Medicine
#507
of 3,626 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#82,847
of 436,406 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Translational Medicine
#33
of 262 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,952,553 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,626 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 436,406 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 262 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.