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Modelling stillbirth mortality reduction with the Lives Saved Tool

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, November 2017
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Title
Modelling stillbirth mortality reduction with the Lives Saved Tool
Published in
BMC Public Health, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12889-017-4742-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hannah Blencowe, Victoria B. Chou, Joy E. Lawn, Zulfiqar A. Bhutta

Abstract

The worldwide burden of stillbirths is large, with an estimated 2.6 million babies stillborn in 2015 including 1.3 million dying during labour. The Every Newborn Action Plan set a stillbirth target of ≤12 per 1000 in all countries by 2030. Planning tools will be essential as countries set policy and plan investment to scale up interventions to meet this target. This paper summarises the approach taken for modelling the impact of scaling-up health interventions on stillbirths in the Lives Saved tool (LiST), and potential future refinements. The specific application to stillbirths of the general method for modelling the impact of interventions in LiST is described. The evidence for the effectiveness of potential interventions to reduce stillbirths are reviewed and the assumptions of the affected fraction of stillbirths who could potentially benefit from these interventions are presented. The current assumptions and their effects on stillbirth reduction are described and potential future improvements discussed. High quality evidence are not available for all parameters in the LiST stillbirth model. Cause-specific mortality data is not available for stillbirths, therefore stillbirths are modelled in LiST using an attributable fraction approach by timing of stillbirths (antepartum/ intrapartum). Of 35 potential interventions to reduce stillbirths identified, eight interventions are currently modelled in LiST. These include childbirth care, induction for prolonged pregnancy, multiple micronutrient and balanced energy supplementation, malaria prevention and detection and management of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, diabetes and syphilis. For three of the interventions, childbirth care, detection and management of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, and diabetes the estimate of effectiveness is based on expert opinion through a Delphi process. Only for malaria is coverage information available, with coverage estimated using expert opinion for all other interventions. Going forward, potential improvements identified include improving of effectiveness and coverage estimates for included interventions and addition of further interventions. Known effective interventions have the potential to reduce stillbirths and can be modelled using the LiST tool. Data for stillbirths are improving. Going forward the LiST tool should seek, where possible, to incorporate these improving data, and to continually be refined to provide an increasingly reliable tool for policy and programming purposes.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 107 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 107 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 16 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 15%
Researcher 15 14%
Student > Master 10 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 8%
Other 11 10%
Unknown 30 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 23 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 21 20%
Social Sciences 7 7%
Psychology 6 6%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 4 4%
Other 12 11%
Unknown 34 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 November 2017.
All research outputs
#9,716,599
of 12,151,889 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#7,063
of 8,223 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#236,956
of 331,756 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#179
of 224 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,151,889 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 224 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.