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Chromatin accessibility: a window into the genome

Overview of attention for article published in Epigenetics & Chromatin, November 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#40 of 497)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
13 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
235 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
984 Mendeley
citeulike
5 CiteULike
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Title
Chromatin accessibility: a window into the genome
Published in
Epigenetics & Chromatin, November 2014
DOI 10.1186/1756-8935-7-33
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maria Tsompana, Michael J Buck

Abstract

Transcriptional activation throughout the eukaryotic lineage has been tightly linked with disruption of nucleosome organization at promoters, enhancers, silencers, insulators and locus control regions due to transcription factor binding. Regulatory DNA thus coincides with open or accessible genomic sites of remodeled chromatin. Current chromatin accessibility assays are used to separate the genome by enzymatic or chemical means and isolate either the accessible or protected locations. The isolated DNA is then quantified using a next-generation sequencing platform. Wide application of these assays has recently focused on the identification of the instrumental epigenetic changes responsible for differential gene expression, cell proliferation, functional diversification and disease development. Here we discuss the limitations and advantages of current genome-wide chromatin accessibility assays with especial attention on experimental precautions and sequence data analysis. We conclude with our perspective on future improvements necessary for moving the field of chromatin profiling forward.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 984 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 17 2%
United Kingdom 3 <1%
France 3 <1%
Korea, Republic of 2 <1%
Japan 2 <1%
Denmark 2 <1%
Germany 2 <1%
Israel 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Other 5 <1%
Unknown 946 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 286 29%
Researcher 191 19%
Student > Master 137 14%
Student > Bachelor 99 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 60 6%
Other 99 10%
Unknown 112 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 356 36%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 319 32%
Medicine and Dentistry 34 3%
Computer Science 29 3%
Neuroscience 26 3%
Other 85 9%
Unknown 135 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 November 2020.
All research outputs
#1,352,502
of 17,833,983 outputs
Outputs from Epigenetics & Chromatin
#40
of 497 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#24,735
of 317,194 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Epigenetics & Chromatin
#1
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,833,983 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 497 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 317,194 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.