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The impact of bone morphology on the outcome of the pivot shift test: a cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, November 2017
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Title
The impact of bone morphology on the outcome of the pivot shift test: a cohort study
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12891-017-1798-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Thomas Branch, Shaun Stinton, Adrija Sharma, Frederic Lavoie, Christian Guier, Philippe Neyret

Abstract

The presence of a positive pivot shift after surgical repair of the ACL is considered an important indicator of a failed reconstruction. The ability to predict the result of a pivot shift test after an ACL reconstruction using variables that can be measured prior to surgery could provide an indication of which patients may be at-risk of a poor surgical outcome.The purpose of this study was to determine whether structural characteristics of the femur and tibia, measured using plain radiographs, were associated with the result of the pivot shift test in unilateral ACL reconstructed patients. Sixteen patients who had undergone unilateral ACL reconstruction were divided into two groups based on the results of manual pivot shift testing: 1) Pivot group; and 2) No pivot group. All patients had standing true lateral radiographs of both knees. Structural measurements of the tibia and femur were made on both knees. In addition, two new variables were created to describe the tibiofemoral mismatch: 1) Femur Tibia Size Ratio (FTSR); and 2) Tibia to Posterior Femoral Condyle Ratio (TPFCR). These measures were compared within groups and between groups. None of the individual structural characteristics were significantly different when compared between groups. No individual structural characteristics had a significant association with the presence of a positive pivot shift. When a between-group analysis was performed, both the FTSR (p < 0.03) and the TPFCR (p < 0.01) were significantly different between the Pivot group and the No Pivot group. A larger FTSR ratio, or a larger femur relative to the tibia, was associated with a positive pivot shift. A smaller TPFCR ratio, or a smaller tibial depth relative to the depth of the lateral posterior femoral condyle, was associated with a positive pivot shift. Structural characteristics in the lateral femoral condyle and lateral tibial plateau were found to be associated with the presence of a positive pivot shift. These characteristics could separate between patients in the Pivot group and the No Pivot group. Two indices, the FTSR and the TPFCR, provided better predictive value than individual characteristics in identifying patients with a knee that was structurally "at-risk" for developing a positive pivot shift.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 37 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 6 16%
Other 4 11%
Student > Postgraduate 4 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 11%
Student > Master 2 5%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 15 41%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 8%
Arts and Humanities 1 3%
Sports and Recreations 1 3%
Materials Science 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 21 57%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 November 2017.
All research outputs
#9,718,179
of 12,154,160 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#1,913
of 2,415 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#240,507
of 335,790 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#100
of 142 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,154,160 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,415 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 335,790 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 142 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.