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Tumorigenesis as a process of gradual loss of original cell identity and gain of properties of neural precursor/progenitor cells

Overview of attention for article published in Cell & Bioscience, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#22 of 658)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
8 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
18 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
69 Mendeley
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Title
Tumorigenesis as a process of gradual loss of original cell identity and gain of properties of neural precursor/progenitor cells
Published in
Cell & Bioscience, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13578-017-0188-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ying Cao

Abstract

Cancer is a complex disease without a unified explanation for its cause so far. Our recent work demonstrates that cancer cells share similar regulatory networks and characteristics with embryonic neural cells. Based on the study, I will address the relationship between tumor and neural cells in more details. I collected the evidence from various aspects of cancer development in many other studies, and integrated the information from studies on cancer cell properties, cell fate specification during embryonic development and evolution. Synthesis of the information strongly supports that cancer cells share much more similarities with neural progenitor/stem cells than with mesenchymal-type cells and that tumorigenesis represents a process of gradual loss of cell or lineage identity and gain of characteristics of neural cells. I also discuss cancer EMT, a concept having been under intense debate, and possibly the true meaning of EMT in cancer initiation and development. This synthesis provides fresh insights into a unified explanation for and a previously unrecognized nature of tumorigenesis, which might not be revealed by studies on individual molecular events. The review will also present some brief suggestions for cancer research based on the proposed model of tumorigenesis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 69 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 69 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 16 23%
Student > Master 11 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 16%
Researcher 10 14%
Other 4 6%
Other 6 9%
Unknown 11 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 27 39%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 12%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 7%
Engineering 4 6%
Neuroscience 3 4%
Other 8 12%
Unknown 14 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 September 2021.
All research outputs
#2,100,445
of 19,180,943 outputs
Outputs from Cell & Bioscience
#22
of 658 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#62,301
of 430,276 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cell & Bioscience
#4
of 34 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,180,943 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 658 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 430,276 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 34 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.