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Utility of antioxidants during assisted reproductive techniques: an evidence based review

Overview of attention for article published in Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, January 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#49 of 617)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
twitter
1 tweeter
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
137 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
184 Mendeley
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Title
Utility of antioxidants during assisted reproductive techniques: an evidence based review
Published in
Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, January 2014
DOI 10.1186/1477-7827-12-112
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ashok Agarwal, Damayanthi Durairajanayagam, Stefan S du Plessis

Abstract

Assisted reproductive technology (ART) is a common treatment of choice for many couples facing infertility issues, be it due to male or female factor, or idiopathic. Employment of ART techniques, however, come with its own challenges as the in vitro environment is not nearly as ideal as the in vivo environment, where reactive oxygen species (ROS) build-up leading to oxidative stress is kept in check by the endogenous antioxidants system. While physiological amounts of ROS are necessary for normal reproductive function in vivo, in vitro manipulation of gametes and embryos exposes these cells to excessive ROS production either by endogenous or exogenous environmental factors. In this review, we discuss the sources of ROS in an in vitro clinical setting and the influence of oxidative stress on gamete/embryo quality and the outcome of IVF/ICSI. Sources of ROS and different strategies of overcoming the excessive generation of ROS in vitro are also highlighted. Endogenously, the gametes and the developing embryo become sources of ROS. Multiple exogenous factors act as potential sources of ROS, including exposure to visible light, composition of culture media, pH and temperature, oxygen concentration, centrifugation during spermatozoa preparation, ART technique involving handling of gamete/embryo and cryopreservation technique (freeze/thawing process). Finally, the use of antioxidants as agents to minimize ROS generation in the in vitro environment and as oral therapy is highlighted. Both enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants are discussed and the outcome of studies using these antioxidants as oral therapy in the male or female or its use in vitro in media is presented. While results of studies using certain antioxidant agents are promising, the current body of evidence as a whole suggests the need for further well-designed and larger scale randomized controlled studies, as well as research to minimize oxidative stress conditions in the clinical ART setting.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 184 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Chile 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Unknown 182 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 35 19%
Researcher 29 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 14%
Student > Bachelor 18 10%
Other 13 7%
Other 32 17%
Unknown 32 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 48 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 34 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 27 15%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 12 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 2%
Other 16 9%
Unknown 43 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 June 2019.
All research outputs
#1,155,770
of 15,248,235 outputs
Outputs from Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology
#49
of 617 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#24,568
of 303,736 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology
#2
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,248,235 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 617 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 303,736 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.