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Acceptability of a digital health intervention alongside physiotherapy to support patients following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
15 tweeters

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
169 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Acceptability of a digital health intervention alongside physiotherapy to support patients following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12891-017-1846-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Emma Dunphy, Fiona L. Hamilton, Irena Spasić, Kate Button

Abstract

Physiotherapy rehabilitation following surgical reconstruction to the Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) can take up to 12 months to complete. Given the lengthy rehabilitation process, a blended intervention can be used to compliment face-to-face physiotherapy with a digital exercise intervention. In this study, we used TRAK, a web-based tool that has been developed to support knee rehabilitation, which provides individually tailored exercise programs with videos, instructions and progress logs for each exercise, relevant health information and a contact option that allows a patient to email a physiotherapist for additional support. The aim of this study was to evaluate the acceptability of TRAK-based blended intervention in post ACL reconstruction rehabilitation. A qualitative research design using semi-structured interviews was used on a convenience sample of participants following an ACL reconstruction, and their treating physiotherapists, in a London NHS hospital. Participants were asked to use TRAK alongside face-to-face physiotherapy for 16 weeks. Interviews were carried out, audio recorded, transcribed verbatim and coded by two researchers independently. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Of the 25 individuals that were approached to be part of the study, 24 consented, comprising 8 females and 16 males, mean age 30 years. 17 individuals used TRAK for 16 weeks and were available for interview. Four physiotherapists were also interviewed. The six main themes identified from patients were: the experience of TRAK rehabilitation, personal characteristics for engagement, strengths and weaknesses of the intervention, TRAK in the future and attitudes to digital healthcare. The main themes from the physiotherapist interviews were: potential benefits, availability of resources and service organization to support use of TRAK. TRAK was found to be an acceptable method of delivering ACL rehabilitation alongside face-to-face physiotherapy. Patients reported that TRAK, specifically the videos, increased their confidence and motivation with their rehabilitation. They identified ways in which TRAK could be developed in the future to meet technological expectations and further support rehabilitation. For Physiotherapists time and availability of computers affected acceptability. Organization of care to support integration of digital exercise interventions such as TRAK into a blended approach to rehabilitation is required.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 169 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 169 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 34 20%
Student > Bachelor 20 12%
Researcher 17 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 7%
Other 29 17%
Unknown 44 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 40 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 28 17%
Sports and Recreations 8 5%
Psychology 7 4%
Social Sciences 6 4%
Other 20 12%
Unknown 60 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 April 2018.
All research outputs
#1,244,565
of 12,861,409 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#294
of 2,558 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#55,887
of 387,900 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#41
of 291 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,861,409 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,558 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 387,900 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 291 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.