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Impact of earplugs and eye mask on sleep in critically ill patients: a prospective randomized study

Overview of attention for article published in Critical Care, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
109 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
37 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
163 Mendeley
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Title
Impact of earplugs and eye mask on sleep in critically ill patients: a prospective randomized study
Published in
Critical Care, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13054-017-1865-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alexandre Demoule, Serge Carreira, Sophie Lavault, Olivier Pallanca, Elise Morawiec, Julien Mayaux, Isabelle Arnulf, Thomas Similowski

Abstract

Poor sleep is common in intensive care unit (ICU) patients, where environmental factors contribute to reduce and fragment sleep. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of earplugs and eye mask on sleep architecture in ICU patients. A single-center randomized controlled trial of 64 ICU patients was conducted from July 2012 to December 2013. Patients were randomly assigned to sleep with or without earplugs and an eye mask from inclusion until ICU discharge. Polysomnography was performed on the first day and night following inclusion. The primary outcome was the proportion of stage N3 sleep over total sleep time. Secondary outcomes were other descriptors of sleep and major outcome variables. In the intervention group, nine (30%) patients did not wear earplugs all night long. The proportion of N3 sleep was 21 [7-28]% in the intervention group and 11 [3-23]% in the control group (p = 0.09). The duration of N3 sleep was higher among the patients in the intervention group who wore earplugs all night long than in the control group (74 [32-106] vs. 31 [7-76] minutes, p = 0.039). The number of prolonged awakenings was smaller in the intervention group (21 [19-26] vs. 31 [21-47] in the control group, p = 0.02). No significant difference was observed between the two groups in terms of clinical outcome variables. Earplugs and eye mask reduce long awakenings and increase N3 duration when they are well tolerated. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02292134 . Registered on 21 Nov 2013.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 109 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 163 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 163 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 21 13%
Student > Bachelor 20 12%
Student > Postgraduate 15 9%
Researcher 13 8%
Other 12 7%
Other 28 17%
Unknown 54 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 47 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 46 28%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 1%
Social Sciences 2 1%
Neuroscience 2 1%
Other 9 6%
Unknown 55 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 97. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 February 2021.
All research outputs
#262,193
of 17,781,901 outputs
Outputs from Critical Care
#166
of 5,367 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#9,534
of 420,959 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Care
#21
of 216 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,781,901 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,367 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 420,959 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 216 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.