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Two ways to fold the genome during the cell cycle: insights obtained with chromosome conformation capture

Overview of attention for article published in Epigenetics & Chromatin, November 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
15 tweeters
wikipedia
5 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
64 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
240 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
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Title
Two ways to fold the genome during the cell cycle: insights obtained with chromosome conformation capture
Published in
Epigenetics & Chromatin, November 2014
DOI 10.1186/1756-8935-7-25
Pubmed ID
Authors

Job Dekker

Abstract

Genetic and epigenetic inheritance through mitosis is critical for dividing cells to maintain their state. This process occurs in the context of large-scale re-organization of chromosome conformation during prophase leading to the formation of mitotic chromosomes, and during the reformation of the interphase nucleus during telophase and early G1. This review highlights how recent studies over the last 5 years employing chromosome conformation capture combined with classical models of chromosome organization based on decades of microscopic observations, are providing new insights into the three-dimensional organization of chromatin inside the interphase nucleus and within mitotic chromosomes. One striking observation is that interphase genome organization displays cell type-specific features that are related to cell type-specific gene expression, whereas mitotic chromosome folding appears universal and tissue invariant. This raises the question of whether or not there is a need for an epigenetic memory for genome folding. Herein, the two different folding states of mammalian genomes are reviewed and then models are discussed wherein instructions for cell type-specific genome folding are locally encoded in the linear genome and transmitted through mitosis, e.g., as open chromatin sites with or without continuous binding of transcription factors. In the next cell cycle these instructions are used to re-assemble protein complexes on regulatory elements which then drive three-dimensional folding of the genome from the bottom up through local action and self-assembly into higher order levels of cell type-specific organization. In this model, no explicit epigenetic memory for cell type-specific chromosome folding is required.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 240 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 1%
United Kingdom 3 1%
France 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Lithuania 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 227 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 71 30%
Researcher 58 24%
Student > Bachelor 28 12%
Student > Master 21 9%
Professor 15 6%
Other 28 12%
Unknown 19 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 115 48%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 71 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 5%
Neuroscience 5 2%
Physics and Astronomy 4 2%
Other 16 7%
Unknown 18 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 November 2021.
All research outputs
#3,275,265
of 21,474,792 outputs
Outputs from Epigenetics & Chromatin
#114
of 550 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#48,574
of 346,377 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Epigenetics & Chromatin
#6
of 35 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,474,792 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 550 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 346,377 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 35 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.