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The epidemiology of Norovirus in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region: a systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in Virology Journal, November 2017
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Title
The epidemiology of Norovirus in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region: a systematic review
Published in
Virology Journal, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12985-017-0877-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Khalil Kreidieh, Rana Charide, Ghassan Dbaibo, Nada M. Melhem

Abstract

Norovirus (NoV) is considered the second leading cause of viral acute gastroenteritis (AGE). To our knowledge, there are no systematic reviews assessing the role of NoV in AGE in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. Consequently, we conducted an extensive systematic literature review on articles studying NoV in the 24 countries of the MENA region during the past 15 years (2000-2015). The methods and reporting were set according to the 2015 PRISMA-P and based on the elements from the international prospective register of systematic reviews (PROSPERO). We retrieved 38 studies meeting our predefined inclusion criteria and were used to extract full data. Studies reporting on NoV were conducted in 15 out of the 24 countries of the region. The reported NoV infection rates in MENA countries ranged between 0.82% and 36.84%. The majority of studies were clinical observational studies assessing NoV rates mainly among children. Participants were recruited from in- and outpatient clinics. NoV infection was reported all year round with with peaks observed mainly during cold months. GII.4 was the predominant genotype detected in stool of participants as reported by 16 out of 25 studies (64%). Overall, there is an increasing recognition of NoV as an important causative agent of AGE across all age groups in the MENA region. Further studies are needed to assess the national and the regional burden of NoV among different age groups, its molecular diversity and seasonal variability.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 41 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 17%
Researcher 6 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 12%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 4 10%
Other 8 20%
Unknown 7 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 10%
Social Sciences 4 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 7%
Other 11 27%
Unknown 11 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 November 2017.
All research outputs
#10,837,539
of 12,225,951 outputs
Outputs from Virology Journal
#1,889
of 2,064 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#282,330
of 339,597 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Virology Journal
#75
of 85 outputs
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