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Trends in HIV infection in the First Affiliated Hospital of Harbin, China

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, November 2014
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Title
Trends in HIV infection in the First Affiliated Hospital of Harbin, China
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, November 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12879-014-0605-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hua-Feng Xu, Hai-Zhou Zhou, Li-Xin Jiang, Na Zhang, Xuan Zhang, Xiu-Ru Guan

Abstract

BackgroundMajor hospitals in most Chinese cities have the capability to perform HIV testing. However, it is not a routine test for all patients and, as a result, many patients are not aware of their HIV status. To understand the rate of HIV infection and the factors associated with infection, we tested serum to determine HIV status and analyzed factors associated with HIV infection.MethodsWe collected blood samples from 348,151 patients who visited the First Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University from 1 January 2007 to 31 December 2012. Serum was screened with an ELISA. If the test was positive, we conducted two additional ELISAs: a repeat with the initial kit and one with another kit. If there was a positive result with either of these two ELISA kits, western blotting was performed at Harbin Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.ResultsThe HIV positivity rate of inpatients significantly increased during the course of this study. HIV infection in patients appeared to differ by sex, age, occupation, marital status, educational level, and route of infection. HIV was more prevalent in men than in women. More than 80% of HIV-positive patients had not received higher (>12 years) education. From 2007 to 2012, HIV-positive patients were mainly infected through sexual transmission. For sexually acquired infections, the rate of HIV infections through homosexual contact has increased rapidly in recent years, and ranged from 36.4% to 65.1%.ConclusionsThe number of patients diagnosed as HIV positive has increased in recent years. Offering routine HIV testing in hospitals is feasible and can increase linkage to HIV care and treatment for many individuals.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 3%
Unknown 29 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 13%
Researcher 3 10%
Student > Bachelor 2 7%
Unspecified 1 3%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 10 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 13%
Social Sciences 3 10%
Psychology 2 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 12 40%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 November 2014.
All research outputs
#18,968,119
of 21,321,365 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#6,094
of 7,277 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#289,953
of 345,780 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#577
of 642 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,321,365 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 642 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.