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Tracking dyspnea up to supplemental oxygen prescription among patients with pulmonary fibrosis

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pulmonary Medicine, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
8 tweeters

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
22 Mendeley
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Title
Tracking dyspnea up to supplemental oxygen prescription among patients with pulmonary fibrosis
Published in
BMC Pulmonary Medicine, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12890-017-0497-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Amy L. Olson, Bridget Graney, Susan Baird, Tara Churney, Kaitlin Fier, Marjorie Korn, Mark McCormick, David Sprunger, Thomas Vierzba, Frederick S. Wamboldt, Jeffrey J. Swigris

Abstract

Dyspnea is the hallmark symptom of pulmonary fibrosis. Supplemental oxygen (O2) is prescribed to many patients with pulmonary fibrosis in hopes of alleviating dyspnea and improving physical functioning. We used response data from the University of California San Diego Shortness of Breath Questionnaire (UCSD) which was administered monthly in the context of a longitudinal, observational study to plot a rich trajectory for dyspnea over time in patients with pulmonary fibrosis. We used other data from that study to identify clinical predictors of being prescribed O2 and to provide additional information for how UCSD scores could be used for clinical purposes. We used linear mixed-effects models and multivariate Cox proportional hazards to model change in dyspnea scores over time and to identify significant predictors of time-to-O2-prescription among a pool of clinically-meaningful candidate variables. In the longitudinal study, all decisions, including whether or not to prescribe O2, were made by subjects' treating physicians, not members of the research team. One-hundred ninety-four subjects with pulmonary fibrosis completed more than one UCSD or were prescribed O2 at some point during the follow-up period (N = 43). Twenty-eight of the 43 had analyzable, longitudinal data and contribute data to the longitudinal UCSD analyses. All 43 were included in the time-to-O2-prescription analyses. Subjects prescribed O2 had more severe dyspnea at enrollment (38.4 ± 19.6 vs. 22.6 ± 18.7, p < 0.0001) and a steeper increase in UCSD scores over time (slope = 1.18 ± 0.53 vs. 0.24 ± 0.09 points per month, p = 0.02) than subjects not prescribed O2. Controlling for baseline UCSD score and FVC%, subjects with a clinical summary diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) were far more likely to be prescribed O2 than subjects with other forms of pulmonary fibrosis (hazard ratio = 4.85, (2.19, 10.74), p < 0.0001). Baseline dyspnea and rise in dyspnea over time predict timing of O2 prescription. Accounting for disease severity, patients with IPF are more likely than patients with other forms of pulmonary fibrosis to be prescribed O2. UCSD scores provide clinically useful information; frequent administration could yield timely data on changes in disease status in patients with pulmonary fibrosis. The longitudinal study is registered on ClinicalTrials.gov ( NCT01961362 ). Registered October 9, 2013.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 4 18%
Student > Master 4 18%
Student > Bachelor 3 14%
Student > Postgraduate 3 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 9%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 5 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 14%
Environmental Science 1 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 5%
Social Sciences 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 9 41%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 December 2017.
All research outputs
#2,062,980
of 17,366,233 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pulmonary Medicine
#127
of 1,395 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#66,616
of 419,445 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pulmonary Medicine
#24
of 175 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,366,233 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,395 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 419,445 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 175 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.