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Migraine and body mass index categories: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Headache & Pain, March 2015
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Title
Migraine and body mass index categories: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies
Published in
Journal of Headache & Pain, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s10194-015-0510-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Raffaele Ornello, Patrizia Ripa, Francesca Pistoia, Diana Degan, Cindy Tiseo, Antonio Carolei, Simona Sacco

Abstract

Several studies have assessed the associations between migraine and underweight, pre-obesity or obesity, with conflicting results. To assess the consistency of the data on the topic, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the available observational studies. Multiple electronic databases were systematically searched up to October 2014 for studies assessing the association between migraine and body mass index categories (underweight, pre-obesity, or obesity). Out of 2,022 records, we included 15 studies. When considering the 11 studies following the World Health Organization BMI cutoffs, we found an increased risk of having migraine in underweight subjects (pooled adjusted effect estimate [PAEE] 1.21; 95% CI, 1.07-1.37; P = 0.002) and in obese women (PAEE 1.44; 95% CI, 1.05-1.97; P = 0.023) as compared with normal weight subjects; additionally, pre-obese subjects had an increased risk of having chronic migraine (PAEE 1.39; 95% CI, 1.13-1.71; P = 0.002). When considering all the 15 studies, we additionally found an increased risk of having migraine in obese as compared with normal weight subjects (PAEE 1.14; 95% CI, 1.02-1.27; P = 0.017); additionally, obese subjects had an increased risk of having chronic migraine (PAEE 1.75; 95% CI, 1.33-2.29; P < 0.001). The pooled analysis did not indicate an increased risk of having migraine in pre-obese subjects. The meta-analysis of the available observational studies suggested an association between migraine and obesity likely mediated by gender and migraine frequency. Further studies taking into account gender, migraine type, frequency, activity, and duration could provide more robust evidence.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 83 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 83 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 17%
Researcher 11 13%
Student > Bachelor 11 13%
Student > Postgraduate 8 10%
Student > Master 8 10%
Other 11 13%
Unknown 20 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 36 43%
Neuroscience 4 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 5%
Psychology 3 4%
Other 8 10%
Unknown 24 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 April 2015.
All research outputs
#7,520,371
of 8,673,129 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Headache & Pain
#531
of 603 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#92,080
of 114,238 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Headache & Pain
#29
of 32 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,673,129 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 32 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.