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Evidence of West Nile virus infection in Nepal

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, November 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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28 Mendeley
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Title
Evidence of West Nile virus infection in Nepal
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, November 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12879-014-0606-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wiriya Rutvisuttinunt, Piyawan Chinnawirotpisan, Chonticha Klungthong, Sanjaya Kumar Shrestha, Amod Bahadur Thapa, Arjun Pant, Samuel L Yingst, In-Kyu Yoon, Stefan Fernandez, Julie A Pavlin

Abstract

BackgroundAcute febrile illness is common among those seeking medical care and is frequently treated empirically with the underlying illness remaining undiagnosed in resource-poor countries. A febrile illness study was conducted 2009-2010 to identify known and unknown pathogens circulating in Nepal.MethodStudy methods included diagnostic testing and preliminary ELISA screening of acute and convalescent samples for diseases both known and unknown to be circulating in Nepal, including West Nile virus (WNV). The molecular assays including Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), Sanger sequencing and ultra deep sequencing on MiSeq Illumina Platform were conducted to further confirm the presence of WNV.ResultsThe study enrolled 2,046 patients presenting undifferentiated febrile illness with unknown etiology. Sera from 14 out of 2,046 patients were tested positive for west nile virus (WNV) by nested Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR). Only two out of 14 cases were confirmed for the presence of WNV by sequencing and identified as WNV lineage 1 phylogentically. The two patients were adult males with fever and no neurological symptoms from Kathmandu and Bharatpur, Nepal.ConclusionTwo out of 2,046 serum samples contained fragments of WNV genome resembling WNV lineage 1, which is evidence of the continued spread of WNV which should be considered a possible illness cause in Nepal.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 4%
Unknown 27 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 39%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 21%
Student > Master 3 11%
Student > Bachelor 2 7%
Student > Postgraduate 2 7%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 4 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 39%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 18%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 7%
Computer Science 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 5 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 April 2015.
All research outputs
#8,559,219
of 16,286,988 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#2,058
of 5,912 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#115,622
of 310,161 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#218
of 637 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,286,988 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,912 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 310,161 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 637 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.