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Inpatient satisfaction with medical information received from caregivers: an observational study on the effect of social deprivation

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, November 2017
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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55 Mendeley
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Title
Inpatient satisfaction with medical information received from caregivers: an observational study on the effect of social deprivation
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12913-017-2728-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

L. Moret, E. Anthoine, A. Pourreau, F. Beaudeau, B. Leclère

Abstract

The main objective of this study was to explore the relationships between inpatients' social differentiation and satisfaction with the medical information delivered by caregivers. In four departments of a teaching hospital, patients were enrolled as well as their attending physician and one of the nurses assigned to them. Structured survey questionnaires were administered face-to-face to patients and caregivers. Patients were asked to rate their satisfaction with the medical information received, the quality and duration of the interactions with the caregivers, and their experience regarding their involvement in medical decision-making. Caregivers were asked to rate their perception of the patients' social position and involvement in medical decision-making. Social deprivation was assessed using the EPICES score in particular. The statistical analysis was mainly descriptive and completed by a structural equation model. A sample of 255 patients, 221 pairs of patient-physician and 235 pairs of patient-nurse were considered. One third of the patients (32.7%) were identified as socially deprived. They were significantly less satisfied with the information they received on their health status or their treatment; 56.7% of patients thought that they received sufficient explanations without having to ask. This proportion was significantly lower in socially deprived patients (42.3%) compared to not deprived patients (63.6%, p < 0.01). Patients' reported involvement in medical decision-making was significantly lower for socially deprived patients (75.0% vs 89.0%, p < 0.001). The structural equation model showed that the main determinant of patients' satisfaction regarding medical information was their perceived involvement in informed medical decision-making (CFI = 0.998, RMSEA = 0.022). These findings suggest that physicians and nurses need training on communication targeted towards vulnerable patients, in order to improve the accessibility of medical information, and thus to reduce health inequalities.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 55 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 55 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 27%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 11%
Student > Bachelor 5 9%
Student > Postgraduate 4 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 7%
Other 10 18%
Unknown 11 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 20%
Social Sciences 7 13%
Unspecified 2 4%
Computer Science 2 4%
Other 8 15%
Unknown 14 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 November 2017.
All research outputs
#7,020,568
of 12,211,623 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#2,521
of 4,013 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#161,048
of 339,068 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#104
of 198 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,211,623 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,013 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 339,068 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 198 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.