↓ Skip to main content

Situational analysis of antibiotic use and resistance in Ghana: policy and regulation

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, November 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
2 policy sources
twitter
8 tweeters
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
48 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
335 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Situational analysis of antibiotic use and resistance in Ghana: policy and regulation
Published in
BMC Public Health, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12889-017-4910-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Saviour Kwame Yevutsey, Kwame Ohene Buabeng, Moses Aikins, Berko Panyin Anto, Richard B. Biritwum, Niels Frimodt-Møller, Martha Gyansa-Lutterodt

Abstract

Antibiotics have played an essential role in decreasing morbidity and mortality from infectious diseases. However, indiscriminate use and unrestricted access is contributing to the emergence of bacterial resistance. This paper reports on a situational analysis of antimicrobial use and resistance in Ghana, with focus on policy and regulation. Relevant policy documents, reports, regulations and enactments were reviewed. PubMed and Google search engines were used to extract relevant published papers. Websites of stakeholders such as Ministry of Health (MOH) and its agencies were also reviewed. An interview guide was used to elicit responses from selected officials from these sectors. Laws and guidelines to control the use of antimicrobials in humans were available but not for animals. There was no National Antimicrobial Policy (NAP). A health practice regulatory law mandates Physicians, Physician Assistants, Midwives and trained Nurses to prescribe antimicrobials. However, antibiotics are widely prescribed and dispensed by unauthorised persons, suggesting weak enforcement of the laws. Antibiotics were also supplied to and from unapproved medicine outlets. The Standard Treatment Guidelines (STG), Essential Medicines List (EML) and the National Health Insurance Scheme Medicines List (NHISML) provide restrictions regarding levels of prescribing of antimicrobials. However, existing guidelines on antibiotic use are mostly not adhered to. The use of Automatic Stop Orders to avoid wastage in the hospitals is also not practiced. Data on use of antibiotics for individuals are not readily available in most facilities. Again, there are no standards or guidelines on veterinary use of antibiotics. Surveillance systems for consumption of antibiotics and resistance monitoring were not in place in most health facilities. However, there is an ongoing national action to create awareness on bacteria resistance, strengthening knowledge through research and surveillance and development of NAP in line with global action plan on antimicrobial resistance. Absence of national antimicrobial policy, weak regulatory environment and non-adherence to practice standards may have contributed to increased and unregulated access to antimicrobials in Ghana, a catalyst for development and spread of antimicrobial resistance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 335 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 335 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 69 21%
Student > Bachelor 52 16%
Researcher 32 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 7%
Student > Postgraduate 22 7%
Other 56 17%
Unknown 79 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 67 20%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 44 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 28 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 26 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 5%
Other 64 19%
Unknown 89 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 July 2021.
All research outputs
#2,645,879
of 21,453,375 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#3,046
of 13,931 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#72,093
of 446,149 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#222
of 718 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,453,375 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 13,931 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 446,149 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 718 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.