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A familial risk enriched cohort as a platform for testing early interventions to prevent severe mental illness

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, December 2014
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Title
A familial risk enriched cohort as a platform for testing early interventions to prevent severe mental illness
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, December 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12888-014-0344-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rudolf Uher, Jill Cumby, Lynn E MacKenzie, Jessica Morash-Conway, Jacqueline M Glover, Alice Aylott, Lukas Propper, Sabina Abidi, Alexa Bagnell, Barbara Pavlova, Tomas Hajek, David Lovas, Kathleen Pajer, William Gardner, Adrian Levy, Martin Alda

Abstract

BackgroundSevere mental illness (SMI), including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and severe depression, is responsible for a substantial proportion of disability in the population. This article describes the aims and design of a research study that takes a novel approach to targeted prevention of SMI. It is based on the rationale that early developmental antecedents to SMI are likely to be more malleable than fully developed mood or psychotic disorders and that low-risk interventions targeting antecedents may reduce the risk of SMI.Methods/DesignFamilies Overcoming Risks and Building Opportunities for Well-being (FORBOW) is an accelerated cohort study that includes a large proportion of offspring of parents with SMI and embeds intervention trials in a cohort multiple randomized controlled trial (cmRCT) design. Antecedents are conditions of the individual that are distressing but not severely impairing, predict SMI with moderate-to-large effect sizes and precede the onset of SMI by at least several years. FORBOW focuses on the following antecedents: affective lability, anxiety, psychotic-like experiences, basic symptoms, sleep problems, somatic symptoms, cannabis use and cognitive delay. Enrolment of offspring over a broad age range (0 to 21 years) will allow researchers to draw conclusions on a longer developmental period from a study of shorter duration. Annual assessments cover a full range of psychopathology, cognitive abilities, eligibility criteria for interventions and outcomes. Pre-emptive early interventions (PEI) will include skill training for parents of younger children and courses in emotional well-being skills based on cognitive behavioural therapy for older children and youth. A sample enriched for familial risk of SMI will enhance statistical power for testing the efficacy of PEI.DiscussionFORBOW offers a platform for efficient and unbiased testing of interventions selected according to best available evidence. Since few differences exist between familial and ¿sporadic¿ SMI, the same interventions are likely to be effective in the general population. Comparison of short-term efficacy of PEI on antecedents and the long term efficacy for preventing the onset of SMI will provide an experimental test of the etiological role of antecedents in the development of SMI.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 361 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 <1%
United States 2 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Unknown 355 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 71 20%
Researcher 50 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 47 13%
Student > Bachelor 38 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 25 7%
Other 64 18%
Unknown 66 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 128 35%
Medicine and Dentistry 61 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 27 7%
Social Sciences 27 7%
Neuroscience 11 3%
Other 21 6%
Unknown 86 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 December 2014.
All research outputs
#15,746,849
of 17,814,645 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#3,379
of 3,822 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#260,521
of 317,176 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#312
of 346 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,814,645 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,822 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.1. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 346 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.