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Phylogeography of Nasutitermes corniger (Isoptera: Termitidae) in the Neotropical Region

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, November 2017
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Title
Phylogeography of Nasutitermes corniger (Isoptera: Termitidae) in the Neotropical Region
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12862-017-1079-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Amanda de Faria Santos, Tiago Fernandes Carrijo, Eliana Marques Cancello, Adriana Coletto Morales-Corrêa e Castro

Abstract

The Neotropical Region is known for its biodiversity and ranks third in number of known termite species. However, biogeographic and phylogeographic information of termites of this region is limited compared to other world geographic regions. Nasutitermes corniger is widely distributed in the region and is of considerable economic importance. The goal of this study was to describe the phylogeography of N. corniger in the Neotropical Region, to better understand its evolutionary processes. The sampled populations of N. corniger showed high genetic variation. Results indicated strong geographic structure among N. corniger populations, with most haplotypes not broadly shared among separated locations. Phylogeographic analyses showed a dispersal route for N. corniger from Central America into South America via the Isthmus of Panama, with subsequent dispersal through the highlands east of the Andes and into eastern regions of the continent. The majority of haplotypes were limited in distribution to proximal regions, corresponding to particular biomes (Atlantic Forest, Amazonia, Chaco, Cerrado and Caatinga). Nasutitermes corniger is suggested to be a good model for biogeographic and phylogeographic studies in the Neotropical Region. This study clarified the phylogeographic history of N. corniger and can contribute to the understanding of biogeographic dispersion processes in the Neotropical Region.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 37 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 7 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 19%
Student > Master 7 19%
Professor 4 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Other 6 16%
Unknown 3 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 59%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 16%
Environmental Science 3 8%
Unknown 6 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 November 2017.
All research outputs
#10,812,507
of 12,196,947 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#2,145
of 2,285 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#281,231
of 338,498 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#88
of 97 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,196,947 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,285 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.1. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 97 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.