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Evidence of high-altitude adaptation in the glyptosternoid fish, Creteuchiloglanis macropterus from the Nujiang River obtained through transcriptome analysis

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, November 2017
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Title
Evidence of high-altitude adaptation in the glyptosternoid fish, Creteuchiloglanis macropterus from the Nujiang River obtained through transcriptome analysis
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12862-017-1074-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jingliang Kang, Xiuhui Ma, Shunping He

Abstract

Organisms living at high altitudes face low oxygen and temperature conditions; thus, the genetic mechanisms underlying the adaptations in these organisms merit investigation. The glyptosternoid fish, Creteuchiloglanis macropterus mainly inhabits regions with gradual increases in altitudes along the Nujiang River and might serve as an appropriate evolutionary model for detecting adaptation processes in environments with altitude changes. We constructed eleven RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) libraries of C. macropterus collected from five locations at different altitudes to identify the genetic signatures of high-altitude adaptation. The comparative genomic analysis indicated that C. macropterus has an accelerated evolutionary rate compared with that of fishes in the lowland, and fishes at higher altitudes might evolve faster. Functional enrichment analysis of the fast-evolving and positively selected genes, differentially expressed genes and highly expressed genes, showed that these genes were involved in many functions related to energy metabolism and hypoxia. Our study provides evidence of high-altitude adaptation in C. macropterus, and the detected adaptive genes might be a resource for future investigations of adaptations to high-altitude environments in other fishes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 14%
Researcher 3 14%
Student > Postgraduate 2 9%
Student > Master 2 9%
Other 3 14%
Unknown 6 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 41%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 14%
Environmental Science 1 5%
Computer Science 1 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 7 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 November 2017.
All research outputs
#12,908,252
of 16,250,419 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#2,418
of 2,759 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#298,584
of 414,329 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#218
of 239 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,250,419 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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