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Theory of mind and neurocognition in early psychosis: a quasi-experimental study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, December 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
77 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Theory of mind and neurocognition in early psychosis: a quasi-experimental study
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, December 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12888-014-0316-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robyn Langdon, Michael H Connors, Megan Still, Philip B Ward, Stanley Catts

Abstract

BackgroundPeople with chronic psychosis often display theory of mind impairments that are not fully accounted for by other, more general neurocognitive deficits. In these patients, both theory of mind and neurocognitive deficits contribute to poor functioning, independently of psychotic symptoms. In young people with recent-onset psychosis, however, it is unclear the extent to which theory of mind impairment is independent of neurocognitive deficits. The primary aim of this study was to examine the evidence for specific theory of mind impairments in early psychosis. A secondary aim was to explore the relations between theory of mind, neurocognition, symptom severity, and functional outcomes.MethodsTwenty-three patients who were within two years of their first psychotic episode and 19 healthy controls completed theory of mind and neurocognitive batteries. Social functioning, quality of life, and symptom severity were also assessed in patients.ResultsPatients demonstrated deficits in tasks assessing theory of mind and neurocognition relative to controls. Patients¿ deficits in theory of mind were evident even after adjusting for their deficits in neurocognition. Neither theory of mind nor neurocognition predicted social functioning or quality of life in this early psychosis sample. Severity of negative symptoms, however, was a significant predictor of both outcomes.ConclusionsWhile a specific theory of mind impairment was evident in this early psychosis sample, severity of negative symptoms emerged as the best predictor of poor functional outcome. Further early psychosis research is needed to examine the longitudinal progression of theory of mind impairments ¿ independent of neurocognitive deficits ¿ and their impact on psychosocial function.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 77 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
Unknown 75 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 19%
Student > Master 11 14%
Researcher 10 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 12%
Student > Bachelor 5 6%
Other 9 12%
Unknown 18 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 35 45%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 14%
Neuroscience 4 5%
Social Sciences 3 4%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 1%
Other 1 1%
Unknown 22 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 February 2016.
All research outputs
#2,184,006
of 14,535,828 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#905
of 3,390 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#44,950
of 302,142 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#75
of 364 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,535,828 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,390 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 302,142 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 364 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.