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Internet-based cognitive behavioural self-help for premenstrual syndrome: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in Trials, December 2014
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Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

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181 Mendeley
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Title
Internet-based cognitive behavioural self-help for premenstrual syndrome: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial
Published in
Trials, December 2014
DOI 10.1186/1745-6215-15-472
Pubmed ID
Authors

Johanna N Kues, Carolyn Janda, Maria Kleinstäuber, Cornelia Weise

Abstract

With a prevalence of 3 to 8% among women of reproductive age, severe premenstrual symptoms are very common. Symptoms range from emotional and cognitive to physical changes. Severe symptoms (that is, premenstrual syndrome) can have a strong impact on everyday functioning and quality of life. Impairment can be as serious as that of dysthymic disorders. Many affected women receive either no treatment at all or are unsatisfied with their treatment. Although there is some evidence for the reduction of distress through cognitive behavioural therapy, there are only a small number of randomised controlled trials carefully investigating the efficacy of this psychotherapeutic approach. Thus, this study aims to evaluate the efficacy of a cognitive behavioural self-help treatment for women suffering from premenstrual syndrome.Methods/design: The study is conducted as a randomised controlled trial. The complex diagnostic assessment includes the completion of a symptom diary over two consecutive cycles and a telephone interview. Eligible women are randomly assigned to either a treatment or a wait-list control group. The intervention is based on cognitive behavioural therapy principles and is provided via the internet. It consists of 14 different modules on which participants work over 8 consecutive weeks. In addition to written information, participants receive email feedback from a clinical psychologist on a weekly basis. Participants assigned to the wait-list receive the treatment after the end of the waiting period (8 weeks). The primary outcome measure is the Premenstrual Syndrome Impairment Measure. Secondary outcomes include the Premenstrual Syndrome Coping Measure, the Short-Form Social Support Questionnaire, the Questionnaire for the Assessment of Relationship Quality, and the Perceived Stress Scale. Data is collected during the premenstrual (luteal) phase at pre-treatment, post-treatment, and 6-month follow-up.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 181 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 181 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 30 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 13%
Researcher 22 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 17 9%
Student > Bachelor 17 9%
Other 32 18%
Unknown 40 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 53 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 23 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 19 10%
Social Sciences 12 7%
Unspecified 6 3%
Other 18 10%
Unknown 50 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 August 2015.
All research outputs
#12,561,007
of 21,321,365 outputs
Outputs from Trials
#3,036
of 5,445 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#164,549
of 345,996 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Trials
#207
of 395 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,321,365 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,445 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.9. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 345,996 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 395 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.