↓ Skip to main content

Australian endemic pest tephritids: genetic, molecular and microbial tools for improved Sterile Insect Technique

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomic Data, December 2014
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
16 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
57 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Australian endemic pest tephritids: genetic, molecular and microbial tools for improved Sterile Insect Technique
Published in
BMC Genomic Data, December 2014
DOI 10.1186/1471-2156-15-s2-s9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kathryn A Raphael, Deborah CA Shearman, A Stuart Gilchrist, John A Sved, Jennifer L Morrow, William B Sherwin, Markus Riegler, Marianne Frommer

Abstract

Among Australian endemic tephritid fruit flies, the sibling species Bactrocera tryoni and Bactrocera neohumeralis have been serious horticultural pests since the introduction of horticulture in the nineteenth century. More recently, Bactrocera jarvisi has also been declared a pest in northern Australia. After several decades of genetic research there is now a range of classical and molecular genetic tools that can be used to develop improved Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) strains for control of these pests. Four-way crossing strategies have the potential to overcome the problem of inbreeding in mass-reared strains of B. tryoni. The ability to produce hybrids between B. tryoni and the other two species in the laboratory has proved useful for the development of genetically marked strains. The identification of Y-chromosome markers in B. jarvisi means that male and female embryos can be distinguished in any strain that carries a B. jarvisi Y chromosome. This has enabled the study of homologues of the sex-determination genes during development of B jarvisi and B. tryoni, which is necessary for the generation of genetic-sexing strains. Germ-line transformation has been established and a draft genome sequence for B. tryoni released. Transcriptomes from various species, tissues and developmental stages, to aid in identification of manipulation targets for improving SIT, have been assembled and are in the pipeline. Broad analyses of the microbiome have revealed a metagenome that is highly variable within and across species and defined by the environment. More specific analyses detected Wolbachia at low prevalence in the tropics but absent in temperate regions, suggesting a possible role for this endosymbiont in future control strategies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 57 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Korea, Republic of 1 2%
United Kingdom 1 2%
Pakistan 1 2%
Unknown 54 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 16 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 21%
Student > Master 11 19%
Student > Postgraduate 4 7%
Other 3 5%
Other 5 9%
Unknown 6 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 36 63%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 11%
Chemistry 3 5%
Environmental Science 2 4%
Psychology 1 2%
Other 3 5%
Unknown 6 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 December 2014.
All research outputs
#16,366,375
of 21,047,241 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomic Data
#31
of 56 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#232,794
of 343,932 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomic Data
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,047,241 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 56 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.1. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 343,932 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them