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Do athletes alter their running mechanics after an Achilles tendon rupture?

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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13 tweeters
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3 Facebook pages

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

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201 Mendeley
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Title
Do athletes alter their running mechanics after an Achilles tendon rupture?
Published in
Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13047-017-0235-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daniel Jandacka, Julia Freedman Silvernail, Jaroslav Uchytil, David Zahradnik, Roman Farana, Joseph Hamill

Abstract

Over the past thirty years, there has been dramatic increase in incidence of Achilles tendon rupture in the athletic population. The purpose of this study was to compare the lower extremity mechanics of Achilles tendon ruptured runners with healthy controls. The participants with a past history of an Achilles tendon repair (n = 11) and healthy control (n = 11) subgroups were matched on sex, age, type of regular physical activity, mass, height, footfall pattern and lateral dominancy. Running kinetics and kinematics of the ankle, knee and hip were recorded using a high-speed motion capture system interfaced with a force platform. Achilles tendon length was measured using ultrasonography. Main outcome measures were lower extremity joint angles and moments during stance phase of running and Achilles tendon lengths. Athletes from Achilles tendon group had an affected gastro-soleus complex. Athletes with history of Achilles tendon rupture had reduced ankle range of motion during second half of the stance phase of running (Δ7.6°), an overextended knee during initial contact (Δ5.2°) and increased affected knee range of motion (Δ4.4°) during the first half of stance phase on their affected limb compared to the healthy control group. There was a 22% increase in the maximal hip joint moment on contralateral side of the Achilles tendon group compared to the healthy controls. These results suggest a compensation mechanism, relatively extended knee at initial ground contact against the deficit in the muscle-tendon complex of the triceps surae. Overextension during sporting activities may place the knee at risk for further injury. Avoidance of AT lengthening and plantarflexion strength deficit after surgery and during rehabilitation might help to manage AT rupture since these factors may be responsible for altered running kinematics.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 201 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 201 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 40 20%
Student > Master 32 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 15 7%
Researcher 13 6%
Other 27 13%
Unknown 49 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 46 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 42 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 38 19%
Engineering 5 2%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 1%
Other 9 4%
Unknown 58 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 February 2018.
All research outputs
#2,637,736
of 15,922,193 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Foot and Ankle Research
#226
of 613 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#85,689
of 411,990 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Foot and Ankle Research
#32
of 59 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,922,193 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 613 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 411,990 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 59 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.