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Serum periostin levels in early in pregnancy are significantly altered in women with miscarriage

Overview of attention for article published in Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, November 2017
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
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1 patent

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

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23 Mendeley
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Title
Serum periostin levels in early in pregnancy are significantly altered in women with miscarriage
Published in
Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12958-017-0307-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

A. Freis, J. Schlegel, R. J. Kuon, A. Doster, J. Jauckus, T. Strowitzki, A. Germeyer

Abstract

Miscarriage is a common complication in pregnancy and there is still a lack of biomarkers usable in asymptomatic patients before the event occurs. Periostin (PER), whose levels rise particularly during injury or inflammation, has been shown to play an important local role in implantation and early embryonic development. As PER has been described as a biomarker in various medical conditions we intended to evaluate if changes in PER serum levels may help to identify women at risk for spontaneous abortion in the first trimester. Women between 18 and 42 years without confounding comorbidities who conceived by IVF/ICSI and ovarian hyperstimulation were analysed in the study after informed consent. Maternal serum samples from 41 patients were assessed at the time of pregnancy testing (PT) and the following first ultrasound checkup (US). Patients were subsequently divided in two groups: (1) patients with subsequent miscarriage in the first trimester (n = 18) and (2) patients with ongoing pregnancy (n = 23), allowing for statistical analysis and investigating the change of PER levels per individual. PER levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Statistical analysis was performed using the Fisher exact and Student's t test. p ≤ 0.05 was considered to be significant. There was no significant difference concerning possible confounders between the two groups. We did not find any significant difference in PER levels at the time point of PT or US. By investigating the interindividual changes of PER between the two time points however, we observed that patients with a following miscarriage showed increasing levels of PER at the time point of PT compared to US in contrast to patients with an ongoing pregnancy who demonstrated a decrease in PER levels. These alterations were significant in the absolute as well as in the relative comparison. The relative expression of PER between PT and US is significantly altered in asymptomatic women with subsequent miscarriage compared to women with ongoing pregnancy. Therefore systemic PER levels might represent a potential promising biomarker for the assessment of pregnancy outcome. Not applicable.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 26%
Student > Bachelor 4 17%
Researcher 3 13%
Student > Postgraduate 3 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 5 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 52%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Computer Science 1 4%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 6 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 September 2019.
All research outputs
#5,111,389
of 18,984,430 outputs
Outputs from Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology
#191
of 769 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#126,186
of 428,271 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology
#12
of 48 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,984,430 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 769 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 428,271 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 48 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.