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Spasm and flexion-relaxation phenomenon response to large lifting load during the performance of a trunk flexion-extension exercise

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (63rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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9 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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84 Mendeley
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Title
Spasm and flexion-relaxation phenomenon response to large lifting load during the performance of a trunk flexion-extension exercise
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12891-017-1869-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yanjun Ma, Xinhai Shan

Abstract

The flexion relaxation phenomenon (FRP) has been widely investigated. Nevertheless, no study has been reported on the FRP as well as spasm response to large lifting load. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of large lifting load on the FRP response and spasm during execution of a flexion-extension exercise. Twenty-two healthy male university students without low back pain history participated this study. Subjects randomly performed three trials of trunk flexion-extension cycles of 5 s flexion and 5 s extension in each of 4 conditions (three large lifting loads of 15, 20 and 25 kg and one lifting load of 0 kg for comparison). Surface EMG from bilateral erector spinae was recorded during the performance of a trunk anterior flexion-extension exercise. The relaxation phase was determined through the onset of electromyography (EMG) signals. Spasm was evaluated in the relaxation period. The mean normalized electromyography (NEMG) was derived from the raw EMG. Spasm was observed in more than 45% of the individuals and the intensity of muscle activation was increased by more than 78% in the relaxation phase. A large lifting load could lead to a high prevalence of spasms as well as a high intensity of muscle activations on erector spinae muscle in the relaxation period, which may be associated with the development of low back disorder during the performance of a flexion-extension exercise.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 84 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 84 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 11%
Other 6 7%
Student > Bachelor 5 6%
Researcher 5 6%
Other 15 18%
Unknown 28 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 18 21%
Sports and Recreations 10 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 10%
Neuroscience 3 4%
Psychology 3 4%
Other 11 13%
Unknown 31 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 December 2020.
All research outputs
#5,802,249
of 20,947,528 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#1,131
of 3,703 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#135,922
of 442,727 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#115
of 315 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,947,528 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,703 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 442,727 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 315 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.