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Profiling sugar metabolism during fruit development in a peach progeny with different fructose-to-glucose ratios

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Plant Biology, November 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#36 of 1,525)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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63 Dimensions

Readers on

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83 Mendeley
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Title
Profiling sugar metabolism during fruit development in a peach progeny with different fructose-to-glucose ratios
Published in
BMC Plant Biology, November 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12870-014-0336-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elsa Desnoues, Yves Gibon, Valentina Baldazzi, Véronique Signoret, Michel Génard, Bénédicte Quilot-Turion

Abstract

BackgroundFruit taste is largely affected by the concentration of soluble sugars and organic acids and non-negligibly by fructose concentration, which is the sweetest-tasting sugar. To date, many studies investigating the sugars in fruit have focused on a specific sugar or enzyme and often on a single variety, but only a few detailed studies addressing sugar metabolism both as a whole and dynamic system are available. In commercial peach fruit, sucrose is the main sugar, followed by fructose and glucose, which have similar levels. Interestingly, low fructose-to-glucose ratios have been observed in wild peach accessions. A cross between wild peach and commercial varieties offers an outstanding possibility to study fruit sugar metabolism.ResultsThis work provides a large dataset of sugar composition and the capacities of enzymes that are involved in sugar metabolism during peach fruit development and its genetic diversity. A large fraction of the metabolites and enzymes involved in peach sugar metabolism were assayed within a peach progeny of 106 genotypes, of which one quarter displayed a low fructose-to-glucose ratio. This profiling was performed at six stages of growth using high throughput methods. Our results permit drawing a quasi-exhaustive scheme of sugar metabolism in peach. The use of a large number of genotypes revealed a remarkable robustness of enzymatic capacities across genotypes and years, despite strong variations in sugar composition, in particular the fructose-to-glucose ratio, within the progeny. A poor correlation was also found between the enzymatic capacities and the accumulation rates of metabolites.ConclusionsThese results invalidate the hypothesis of the straightforward enzymatic control of sugar concentration in peach fruit. Alternative hypotheses concerning the regulation of fructose concentration are discussed based on experimental data. This work lays the foundation for a comprehensive study of the mechanisms involved in sugar metabolism in developing fruit.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 83 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 1%
Italy 1 1%
Unknown 81 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 20%
Researcher 13 16%
Professor > Associate Professor 11 13%
Student > Master 7 8%
Student > Postgraduate 5 6%
Other 13 16%
Unknown 17 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 48 58%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 7%
Chemistry 3 4%
Environmental Science 1 1%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 1%
Other 4 5%
Unknown 20 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 September 2015.
All research outputs
#830,114
of 12,340,143 outputs
Outputs from BMC Plant Biology
#36
of 1,525 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#21,572
of 270,720 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Plant Biology
#4
of 90 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,340,143 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,525 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,720 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 90 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.