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Comparative structural analysis of haemagglutinin proteins from type A influenza viruses: conserved and variable features

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Bioinformatics, December 2014
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)
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3 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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10 Dimensions

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32 Mendeley
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Title
Comparative structural analysis of haemagglutinin proteins from type A influenza viruses: conserved and variable features
Published in
BMC Bioinformatics, December 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12859-014-0363-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Irene Righetto, Adelaide Milani, Giovanni Cattoli, Francesco Filippini

Abstract

BackgroundGenome variation is very high in influenza A viruses. However, viral evolution and spreading is strongly influenced by immunogenic features and capacity to bind host cells, depending in turn on the two major capsidic proteins. Therefore, such viruses are classified based on haemagglutinin and neuraminidase types, e.g. H5N1. Current analyses of viral evolution are based on serological and primary sequence comparison; however, comparative structural analysis of capsidic proteins can provide functional insights on surface regions possibly crucial to antigenicity and cell binding.ResultsWe performed extensive structural comparison of influenza virus haemagglutinins and of their domains and subregions to investigate type- and/or domain-specific variation. We found that structural closeness and primary sequence similarity are not always tightly related; moreover, type-specific features could be inferred when comparing surface properties of haemagglutinin subregions, monomers and trimers, in terms of electrostatics and hydropathy. Focusing on H5N1, we found that variation at the receptor binding domain surface intriguingly relates to branching of still circulating clades from those ones that are no longer circulating.ConclusionsEvidence from this work suggests that integrating phylogenetic and serological analyses by extensive structural comparison can help in understanding the `functional evolution¿ of viral surface determinants. In particular, variation in electrostatic and hydropathy patches can provide molecular evolution markers: intriguing surface charge redistribution characterizing the haemagglutinin receptor binding domains from circulating H5N1 clades 2 and 7 might have contributed to antigenic escape hence to their evolutionary success and spreading.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 32 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 22%
Researcher 6 19%
Student > Master 6 19%
Student > Bachelor 5 16%
Other 2 6%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 2 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 16%
Engineering 3 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 9%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 3 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 December 2014.
All research outputs
#8,402,987
of 14,573,111 outputs
Outputs from BMC Bioinformatics
#3,279
of 5,420 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#130,688
of 301,382 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Bioinformatics
#184
of 321 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,573,111 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,420 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 301,382 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 321 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.