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Male Gender is independently associated with pulmonary tuberculosis among sputum and non-sputum producers people with presumptive tuberculosis in Southwestern Uganda

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, December 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 policy source
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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29 Dimensions

Readers on

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122 Mendeley
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Title
Male Gender is independently associated with pulmonary tuberculosis among sputum and non-sputum producers people with presumptive tuberculosis in Southwestern Uganda
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, December 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12879-014-0638-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yap Boum, Daniel Atwine, Patrick Orikiriza, Justus Assimwe, Anne-Laure Page, Juliet Mwanga-Amumpaire, Maryline Bonnet

Abstract

BackgroundLittle is known about the association between gender and risk of TB infection. We sought to assess the impact of gender on TB prevalence among people with presumptive tuberculosis at a regional referral hospital in a high TB and HIV prevalence setting.MethodsWe analyzed data from two diagnostic TB studies conducted in rural, southwestern Uganda. People with presumptive tuberculosis were evaluated by chest X-ray, fluorescence microscopy, TB culture, and HIV testing. Our primary outcome of interest was TB infection, as defined by a positive TB culture. Our primary explanatory variable of interest was gender. We fit univariable and multivariable logistic regression models to investigate associations between TB infection and gender, before and after adjusting or possible confounding factors, including ability to produce sputum, age and residence.ResultsBetween April 2010 and September 2012, 863 people with presumptive tuberculosis (PWPTB) were enrolled in the two studies at Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital (MRRH) in Uganda. Among them 664 (76.9%) were able to produce sputum. X-ray was suggestive of TB for 258 (66.5%) of males and 175 (44.8%) of female (p¿<¿0.001). using microscopy 84 (20%) of males and 48 (10.9%) of females were diagnosed with TB (p¿<¿0.001) while 122 (30.3%) of males and 76 (18.4%) of females were diagnosed with TB (p¿<¿0.001) using TB culture.In multivariable logistic regression models, the odds of having TB was higher in males than females (AOR 2.2 (1.56-3.18 95%CI°, P¿<¿0.001), after adjustment for age, HIV status, ability to produce sputum, and residence.ConclusionIn Southwestern Uganda, TB prevalence is higher among male than female people with presumptive TB. The increased risk of TB among males is independent of other TB risk factors. These findings emphasize the need for gender-focused interventions aimed at reducing TB transmission.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 122 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Chile 1 <1%
Unknown 121 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 28 23%
Researcher 20 16%
Student > Bachelor 17 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 7%
Lecturer 7 6%
Other 20 16%
Unknown 21 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 46 38%
Nursing and Health Professions 15 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 5%
Social Sciences 6 5%
Other 18 15%
Unknown 25 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2016.
All research outputs
#4,763,971
of 17,353,889 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1,397
of 6,152 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#76,951
of 313,283 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#149
of 638 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,353,889 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,152 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 313,283 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 638 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.