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Quadriceps arthrogenic muscle inhibition: the effects of experimental knee joint effusion on motor cortex excitability

Overview of attention for article published in Arthritis Research & Therapy, December 2014
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

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32 tweeters
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5 Facebook pages
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1 video uploader

Citations

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57 Dimensions

Readers on

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188 Mendeley
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Title
Quadriceps arthrogenic muscle inhibition: the effects of experimental knee joint effusion on motor cortex excitability
Published in
Arthritis Research & Therapy, December 2014
DOI 10.1186/s13075-014-0502-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

David Andrew Rice, Peter John McNair, Gwyn Nancy Lewis, Nicola Dalbeth

Abstract

IntroductionMarked weakness of the quadriceps muscles is typically observed following injury, surgery or pathology affecting the knee joint. This is partly due to ongoing neural inhibition that prevents the central nervous system from fully activating the quadriceps, a process known as arthrogenic muscle inhibition (AMI). This study aimed to further investigate the mechanisms underlying AMI by exploring the effects of experimental knee joint effusion on quadriceps corticomotor and intracortical excitability.MethodsSeventeen healthy volunteers participated in this study. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to measure quadriceps motor evoked potential area, short-interval intracortical inhibition, intracortical facilitation and cortical silent period duration before and after experimental knee joint effusion. Joint effusion was induced by the intraarticular infusion of dextrose saline into the knee.ResultsThere was a significant increase in quadriceps motor evoked potential area following joint infusion, both at rest (P¿=¿0.01) and during voluntary muscle contraction (P¿=¿0.02). Cortical silent period duration was significantly reduced following joint infusion (P¿=¿0.02). There were no changes in short interval intracortical inhibition or intracortical facilitation over time (all P¿>¿0.05).ConclusionsThe results of this study provide no evidence for a supraspinal contribution to quadriceps AMI. Paradoxically, but consistent with previous observations in patients with chronic knee joint pathology, quadriceps corticomotor excitability increased after experimental knee joint effusion. The increase in quadriceps corticomotor excitability may be at least partly mediated by a decrease in gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic inhibition within the motor cortex.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 32 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 188 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 1%
Germany 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 184 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 36 19%
Researcher 25 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 17 9%
Student > Bachelor 16 9%
Other 14 7%
Other 47 25%
Unknown 33 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 50 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 34 18%
Sports and Recreations 26 14%
Neuroscience 14 7%
Engineering 5 3%
Other 16 9%
Unknown 43 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 22. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 June 2021.
All research outputs
#1,359,912
of 21,798,458 outputs
Outputs from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#192
of 2,888 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#21,564
of 347,368 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#4
of 55 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,798,458 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,888 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 347,368 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 55 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.