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Spatiotemporal interactions between wild boar and cattle: implications for cross-species disease transmission

Overview of attention for article published in Veterinary Research, December 2014
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Title
Spatiotemporal interactions between wild boar and cattle: implications for cross-species disease transmission
Published in
Veterinary Research, December 2014
DOI 10.1186/s13567-014-0122-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jose A Barasona, M Cecilia Latham, Pelayo Acevedo, Jose A Armenteros, A David M Latham, Christian Gortazar, Francisco Carro, Ramon C Soriguer, Joaquin Vicente

Abstract

Controlling infectious diseases at the wildlife/livestock interface is often difficult because the ecological processes driving transmission between wildlife reservoirs and sympatric livestock populations are poorly understood. Thus, assessing how animals use their environment and how this affects interspecific interactions is an important factor in determining the local risk for disease transmission and maintenance. We used data from concurrently monitored GPS-collared domestic cattle and wild boar (Sus scrofa) to assess spatiotemporal interactions and associated implications for bovine tuberculosis (TB) transmission in a complex ecological and epidemiological system, Doñana National Park (DNP, South Spain). We found that fine-scale spatial overlap of cattle and wild boar was seasonally high in some habitats. In general, spatial interactions between the two species were highest in the marsh-shrub ecotone and at permanent water sources, whereas shrub-woodlands and seasonal grass-marshlands were areas with lower predicted relative interactions. Wild boar and cattle generally used different resources during winter and spring in DNP. Conversely, limited differences in resource selection during summer and autumn, when food and water availability were limiting, resulted in negligible spatial segregation and thus probably high encounter rates. The spatial gradient in potential overlap between the two species across DNP corresponded well with the spatial variation in the observed incidence of TB in cattle and prevalence of TB in wild boar. We suggest that the marsh-shrub ecotone and permanent water sources act as important points of TB transmission in our system, particularly during summer and autumn. Targeted management actions are suggested to reduce potential interactions between cattle and wild boar in order to prevent disease transmission and design effective control strategies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 183 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Argentina 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 175 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 42 23%
Student > Master 29 16%
Researcher 28 15%
Student > Bachelor 22 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 13 7%
Other 27 15%
Unknown 22 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 73 40%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 38 21%
Environmental Science 11 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 3%
Other 14 8%
Unknown 34 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 December 2014.
All research outputs
#3,164,689
of 4,622,892 outputs
Outputs from Veterinary Research
#308
of 429 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#100,788
of 150,384 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Veterinary Research
#8
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,622,892 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 429 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.8. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.