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A putative causal relationship between genetically determined female body shape and posttraumatic stress disorder

Overview of attention for article published in Genome Medicine, November 2017
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Title
A putative causal relationship between genetically determined female body shape and posttraumatic stress disorder
Published in
Genome Medicine, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13073-017-0491-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Renato Polimanti, Ananda B. Amstadter, Murray B. Stein, Lynn M. Almli, Dewleen G. Baker, Laura J. Bierut, Bekh Bradley, Lindsay A. Farrer, Eric O. Johnson, Anthony King, Henry R. Kranzler, Adam X. Maihofer, John P. Rice, Andrea L. Roberts, Nancy L. Saccone, Hongyu Zhao, Israel Liberzon, Kerry J. Ressler, Caroline M. Nievergelt, Karestan C. Koenen, Joel Gelernter

Abstract

The nature and underlying mechanisms of the observed increased vulnerability to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in women are unclear. We investigated the genetic overlap of PTSD with anthropometric traits and reproductive behaviors and functions in women. The analysis was conducted using female-specific summary statistics from large genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and a cohort of 3577 European American women (966 PTSD cases and 2611 trauma-exposed controls). We applied a high-resolution polygenic score approach and Mendelian randomization analysis to investigate genetic correlations and causal relationships. We observed an inverse association of PTSD with genetically determined anthropometric traits related to body shape, independent of body mass index (BMI). The top association was related to BMI-adjusted waist circumference (WCadj; R = -0.079, P < 0.001, Q = 0.011). We estimated a relative decrease of 64.6% (95% confidence interval = 27.5-82.7) in the risk of PTSD per 1-SD increase in WCadj. MR-Egger regression intercept analysis showed no evidence of pleiotropic effects in this association (Ppleiotropy = 0.979). We also observed associations of genetically determined WCadj with age at first sexual intercourse and number of sexual partners (P = 0.013 and P < 0.001, respectively). There is a putative causal relationship between genetically determined female body shape and PTSD, which could be mediated by evolutionary mechanisms involved in human sexual behaviors.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 83 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 83 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 11%
Professor 9 11%
Student > Bachelor 8 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 8%
Other 6 7%
Other 10 12%
Unknown 34 41%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 13%
Psychology 8 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 5%
Social Sciences 4 5%
Other 15 18%
Unknown 36 43%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 April 2022.
All research outputs
#16,953,542
of 21,017,702 outputs
Outputs from Genome Medicine
#1,275
of 1,344 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#329,350
of 442,484 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genome Medicine
#101
of 101 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,017,702 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,344 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.5. This one is in the 2nd percentile – i.e., 2% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 442,484 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 101 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.