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Self-reported physical activity correlates in Swedish adults with multiple sclerosis: a cross-sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Neurology, December 2017
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2 tweeters

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3 Dimensions

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69 Mendeley
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Title
Self-reported physical activity correlates in Swedish adults with multiple sclerosis: a cross-sectional study
Published in
BMC Neurology, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12883-017-0981-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elisabeth Anens, Lena Zetterberg, Charlotte Urell, Margareta Emtner, Karin Hellström

Abstract

The benefits of physical activity in persons with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) are considerable. Knowledge about factors that correlate to physical activity is helpful in order to develop successful strategies to increase physical activity in persons with MS. Previous studies have focused on correlates to physical activity in MS, however falls self-efficacy, social support and enjoyment of physical activity are not much studied, as well as if the correlates differ with regard to disease severity. The aim of the study was to examine associations between physical activity and age, gender, employment, having children living at home, education, disease type, disease severity, fatigue, self-efficacy for physical activity, falls self-efficacy, social support and enjoyment of physical activity in a sample of persons with MS and in subgroups with regard to disease severity. This is a cross-sectional survey study including Swedish community living adults with MS, 287 persons, response rate 58.2%. The survey included standardized self-reported scales measuring physical activity, disease severity, fatigue, self-efficacy for physical activity, falls self-efficacy, and social support. Physical activity was measured by the Physical Activity Disability Survey - Revised. Multiple regression analyzes showed that 59% (F(6,3) = 64.9, p = 0.000) of the variation in physical activity was explained by having less severe disease (β = -0.30), being employed (β = 0.26), having high falls self-efficacy (β = 0.20), having high self-efficacy for physical activity (β = 0.17), and enjoying physical activity (β = 0.11). In persons with moderate/severe MS, self-efficacy for physical activity explained physical activity. Consistent with previous research in persons with MS in other countries this study shows that disease severity, employment and self-efficacy for physical activity are important for physical activity. Additional important factors were falls self-efficacy and enjoyment. More research is needed to confirm this and the subgroup differences.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 69 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 69 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 22%
Student > Bachelor 11 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 12%
Lecturer 3 4%
Other 6 9%
Unknown 17 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 18 26%
Sports and Recreations 11 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 13%
Psychology 6 9%
Computer Science 2 3%
Other 4 6%
Unknown 19 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 December 2017.
All research outputs
#9,390,308
of 12,241,646 outputs
Outputs from BMC Neurology
#1,025
of 1,383 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#223,136
of 341,040 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Neurology
#43
of 79 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,241,646 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,383 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 341,040 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 79 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.