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The sleep and circadian modulation of neural reward pathways: a protocol for a pair of systematic reviews

Overview of attention for article published in Systematic Reviews, December 2017
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2 tweeters

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Title
The sleep and circadian modulation of neural reward pathways: a protocol for a pair of systematic reviews
Published in
Systematic Reviews, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13643-017-0631-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jamie E. M. Byrne, Greg Murray

Abstract

Animal research suggests that neural reward activation may be systematically modulated by sleep and circadian function. Whether humans also exhibit sleep and circadian modulation of neural reward pathways is unclear. This area is in need of further research, as it has implications for the involvement of sleep and circadian function in reward-related disorders. The aim of this paper is to describe the protocol for a pair of systematic literature reviews to synthesise existing literature related to (1) sleep and (2) circadian modulation of neural reward pathways in healthy human populations. A systematic review of relevant online databases (Scopus, PubMed, Web of Science, ProQuest, PsycINFO and EBSCOhost) will be conducted. Reference lists, relevant reviews and supplementary data will be searched for additional articles. Articles will be included if (a) they contain a sleep- or circadian-related predictor variable with a neural reward outcome variable, (b) use a functional magnetic resonance imaging protocol and (c) use human samples. Articles will be excluded if study participants had disorders known to affect the reward system. The articles will be screened by two independent authors. Two authors will complete the data extraction form, with two authors independently completing the quality assessment tool for the selected articles, with a consensus reached with a third author if needed. Narrative synthesis methods will be used to analyse the data. The findings from this pair of systematic literature reviews will assist in the identification of the pathways involved in the sleep and circadian function modulation of neural reward in healthy individuals, with implications for disorders characterised by dysregulation in sleep, circadian rhythms and reward function. PROSPERO CRD42017064994.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 22%
Student > Master 3 17%
Professor 2 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 11%
Other 1 6%
Unknown 2 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 6 33%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 17%
Neuroscience 2 11%
Sports and Recreations 1 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 6%
Other 2 11%
Unknown 3 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 December 2017.
All research outputs
#9,398,496
of 12,253,439 outputs
Outputs from Systematic Reviews
#794
of 946 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#223,729
of 341,897 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Systematic Reviews
#69
of 102 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,253,439 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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