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Is the policy of allowing a female labor companion feasible in developing countries? Results from a cross sectional study among Sri Lankan practitioners

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (68th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

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58 Mendeley
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Title
Is the policy of allowing a female labor companion feasible in developing countries? Results from a cross sectional study among Sri Lankan practitioners
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12884-017-1578-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hemantha Senanayake, Rajitha Dilhan Wijesinghe, Kesavan Rajasekharan Nayar

Abstract

Companionship during labor is known to have both physical and psychosocial benefits to mother and baby. Sri Lanka made a policy decision to allow a labour companion in 2011. However, implementation has been unsatisfactory. Given the leading role Obstetricians play in the implementation of policy, a study was undertaken to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices among them. A descriptive cross sectional study was conducted among consultant obstetricians working in the state hospitals using the platform 'Survey Monkey'. Out of the 140 consultant obstetricians invited, 68(48.5%) participated. Among the study participants, 40 (58.8%) did not allow labour companions in their wards. Lack of space (n = 32; 80%) and the volume of work in the labor wards (n = 22; 55%) were the commonest reasons for not allowing a companion. Only 16.7% (n = 5) of the obstetricians handling more than 300 deliveries per month allowed a companion (p = 0.001). Less than 50% of the obstetricians were aware of the advantages associated with the practice such as shorter labor, lesser analgesic requirement, higher chances of a normal birth, improved neonatal outcome and reduced requirements for labor augmentation for slow progress of labor. Knowledge on advantages on breast feeding and reduced need of instrumental delivery also remained low. In an individual unit, the consultant often decides policy. The study points out the need to improve awareness among the practitioners.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 58 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 58 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 14%
Student > Postgraduate 6 10%
Student > Bachelor 5 9%
Researcher 5 9%
Other 9 16%
Unknown 11 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 31%
Nursing and Health Professions 16 28%
Social Sciences 5 9%
Psychology 3 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Other 2 3%
Unknown 13 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 January 2018.
All research outputs
#2,086,102
of 12,380,517 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#636
of 2,236 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#83,021
of 354,028 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#40
of 125 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,380,517 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,236 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 354,028 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 125 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.