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Patient safety skills in primary care: a national survey of GP educators

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Family Practice, December 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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13 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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64 Mendeley
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Title
Patient safety skills in primary care: a national survey of GP educators
Published in
BMC Family Practice, December 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12875-014-0206-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maria Ahmed, Sonal Arora, John McKay, Susannah Long, Charles Vincent, Moya Kelly, Nick Sevdalis, Paul Bowie

Abstract

BackgroundClinicians have a vital role in promoting patient safety that goes beyond their technical competence. The qualities and attributes of the safe hospital doctor have been explored but similar work within primary care is lacking. Exploring the skills and attributes of a safe GP may help to inform the development of training programmes to promote patient safety within primary care.PurposeTo determine the views of General Practice Educational Supervisors (GPES) regarding the qualities and attributes of a safe General Practitioner (GP) and the perceived trainability of these `safety skills¿ and to compare selected results with those generated by a previous study of hospital doctors.MethodsThis was a two-stage study comprising content validation of a safety skills questionnaire (originally developed for hospital doctors)(Stage 1) and a prospective survey of all GPES in Scotland (n¿=¿691)(Stage 2).ResultsStage 1: The content-validated questionnaire comprised 66 safety skills/attributes across 17 broad categories with an overall content validation index of 0.92.Stage 2: 348(50%) GPES completed the survey. GPES felt the skills/attributes most important to being a safe GP were honesty(93%), technical clinical skills(89%) and conscientiousness(89%). That deemed least important/relevant to being a safe GP was leadership(36%). This contrasts sharply with the views of hospital doctors in the previous study. GPES felt the most trainable safety skills/attributes were technical skills (93%), situation awareness(75%) and anticipation/preparedness(71%). The least trainable were honesty(35%), humility(33%) and patient awareness/empathy(30%). Additional safety skills identified as relevant to primary care included patient advocacy, negotiation skills, accountability/ownership and clinical intuition (`listening to that worrying little inner voice¿).ConclusionsGPES believe a broad range of skills and attributes contribute to being a safe GP. Important but subtle differences exist between what primary care and secondary care doctors perceive as core safety attributes. Educationalists, GPs and patient safety experts should collaborate to develop and implement training in these skills to ensure that current and future GPs possess the necessary competencies to engage and lead in safety improvement efforts.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 64 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 2%
Unknown 63 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 9 14%
Student > Master 9 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 13%
Researcher 5 8%
Lecturer 4 6%
Other 17 27%
Unknown 12 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 26 41%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 9%
Psychology 4 6%
Social Sciences 3 5%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 2%
Other 5 8%
Unknown 19 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 May 2015.
All research outputs
#2,086,162
of 15,909,697 outputs
Outputs from BMC Family Practice
#287
of 1,617 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#42,210
of 307,033 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Family Practice
#27
of 174 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,909,697 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,617 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 307,033 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 174 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.