↓ Skip to main content

Objectively-assessed physical activity and weight change in young adults: a randomized controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, December 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
8 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
88 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Objectively-assessed physical activity and weight change in young adults: a randomized controlled trial
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12966-017-0620-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jessica L. Unick, Wei Lang, Samantha E. Williams, Dale S. Bond, Caitlin M. Egan, Mark A. Espeland, Rena R. Wing, Deborah F. Tate

Abstract

Reductions in physical activity (PA) are common throughout young adulthood and low PA is associated with weight gain. The SNAP Trial previously reported that two self-regulation approaches to weight gain prevention reduced weight gain over a 2-year period in 18-35 year olds. Presented here are secondary analyses examining changes in PA and the relationship between PA and weight change over 2 years. 599 young adults (age: 27.4 ± 4.4 yrs.; BMI: 25.4 ± 2.6 kg/m2) were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatment arms: Small Changes (reduce calorie intake by 100 kcals/day & add 2000 steps/day), Large Changes (lose 2.3-4.5 kg initially & increase PA to ≥250 min/wk), or Self-guided (control condition). Small and Large Changes received 10, face-to-face group sessions (months 1-4), and two 4-week refresher courses each subsequent year. Body weight and PA were objectively-measured at baseline, 4 months, 1 and 2 years. Daily steps and bout-related moderate-to-vigorous intensity PA (MVPA: ≥3 METs, ≥10-min bouts) was calculated. Changes in bout-related MVPA and daily steps did not differ among treatment groups over the 2-year period (p's > 0.16). Collapsed across groups, participants gaining >1 lb. (n = 187; 39.6%) had smaller changes in bout-related MVPA at 4 months, 1 and 2 years relative to those maintaining or losing weight (≤1 lb. weight gain; n = 282, 60.4%, p's < 0.05). Averaged across time points, this difference equated to 47.8 min/week. Those gaining and not gaining >1 lb. did not differ on daily steps (p's > 0.10). Among participants engaging in ≥250 min/wk. of MVPA at 2 years (n = 181), 30% gained >1 lb. from baseline to 2 years, which was not different from those engaging in 150-250 min/wk. (n = 87; 36%; p = 0.40), but this percentage was significantly lower when compared to those engaging in <150 min/wk. (n = 176; 49%; p < 0.001). On average, PA differences were not observed between young adults assigned to small or large changes self-regulation interventions to prevent weight gain. Regardless of group assignment, higher levels of MVPA were associated with better weight gain prevention over 2 years. Our data suggest that achieving >150 min/week of MVPA is needed for weight gain prevention and that increasing MVPA, rather than steps, should be targeted. www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01183689). Registered Aug 13, 2010.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 88 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 88 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 12 14%
Researcher 12 14%
Student > Master 11 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 7%
Other 15 17%
Unknown 22 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 18 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 14%
Sports and Recreations 9 10%
Psychology 5 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 5%
Other 7 8%
Unknown 33 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 December 2017.
All research outputs
#4,696,488
of 15,922,434 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#1,215
of 1,565 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#135,695
of 411,190 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#126
of 140 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,922,434 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 69th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,565 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 24.1. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 411,190 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 140 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.