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A cluster randomized controlled trial for child and parent weight management: children and parents randomized to the intervention group have correlated changes in adiposity

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Obesity, December 2017
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

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39 Mendeley
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Title
A cluster randomized controlled trial for child and parent weight management: children and parents randomized to the intervention group have correlated changes in adiposity
Published in
BMC Obesity, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40608-017-0175-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Diane C. Berry, Robert G. McMurray, Todd A. Schwartz, Emily G. Hall, Madeline N. Neal, Reuben Adatorwovor

Abstract

Studies have suggested that obesity is linked within families and that successful interventions involve both the parent and child with obesity. However little information exists regarding similarities in adiposity and weight loss between the parent and child, especially in low socio-economic ethnically diverse households. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between the changes from baseline over time in adiposity, weight, health behaviors, and self-efficacy in children (n = 184) and parents (n = 184) participating in an 18-month weight loss program. Within the intervention group only and for each post-baseline time point, Pearson correlation coefficients were computed for children's changes (from baseline) in adiposity, weight, health behaviors, and self-efficacy, with their parents' corresponding changes from baseline, to determine how strongly the dyads were correlated. At the completion of 18 months, the intervention group parents demonstrated strong positive correlations between parent and child change in waist circumference (r = 0.409, p < 0.001), triceps (r = 0.332, p < 0.001), and subscapular (r = 0.292, p = 0.002) skinfolds. There were no significant correlations between weight, health behaviors, eating, and exercise self-efficacy. The results suggest that in the Southern United States low-income parents and their children with obesity are strongly correlated. NCT01378806 Retrospectively Registered on June 22, 2011.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 39 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 31%
Student > Bachelor 6 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 10%
Researcher 3 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 8%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 7 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 10 26%
Sports and Recreations 6 15%
Social Sciences 5 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 10%
Psychology 2 5%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 9 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 December 2017.
All research outputs
#9,402,097
of 12,259,388 outputs
Outputs from BMC Obesity
#121
of 161 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#224,263
of 342,757 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Obesity
#4
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,259,388 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 161 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.2. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 342,757 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.