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Memories of paternal relations are associated with coping and defense mechanisms in breast cancer patients: an observational study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychology, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
56 Mendeley
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Title
Memories of paternal relations are associated with coping and defense mechanisms in breast cancer patients: an observational study
Published in
BMC Psychology, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40359-017-0206-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chiara Renzi, Giada Perinel, Paola Arnaboldi, Sara Gandini, Valeria Vadilonga, Nicole Rotmensz, Angela Tagini, Florence Didier, Gabriella Pravettoni

Abstract

Breast cancer diagnosis and treatment represent stressful events that demand emotional adjustment, thus recruiting coping strategies and defense mechanisms. As parental relations were shown to influence emotion regulation patterns and adaptive processes in adulthood, the present study investigated whether they are specifically associated to coping and defense mechanisms in patients with breast cancer. One hundred and ten women hospitalized for breast cancer surgery were administered questionnaires assessing coping with cancer, defense mechanisms, and memories of parental bonding in childhood. High levels of paternal overprotection were associated with less mature defenses, withdrawal and fantasy and less adaptive coping mechanisms, such as hopelessness/helplessness. Low levels of paternal care were associated with a greater use of repression. No association was found between maternal care, overprotection, coping and defense mechanisms. Immature defenses correlated positively with less adaptive coping styles, while mature defenses were positively associated to a fighting spirit and to fatalism, and inversely related to less adaptive coping styles. These data suggest that paternal relations in childhood are associated with emotional, cognitive, and behavioral regulation in adjusting to cancer immediately after surgery. Early experiences of bonding may constitute a relevant index for adaptation to cancer, indicating which patients are at risk and should be considered for psychological interventions.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 56 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 9 16%
Student > Master 7 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 13%
Researcher 4 7%
Student > Postgraduate 4 7%
Other 12 21%
Unknown 13 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 19 34%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 7%
Neuroscience 2 4%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 2%
Other 5 9%
Unknown 16 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 December 2017.
All research outputs
#2,750,575
of 12,253,439 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychology
#110
of 247 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#89,809
of 341,977 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychology
#10
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,253,439 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 247 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 24.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 341,977 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.