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Mitochondrial genomes of the Baltic clam Macoma balthica(Bivalvia: Tellinidae): setting the stage for studying mito-nuclear incompatibilities

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, December 2014
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Title
Mitochondrial genomes of the Baltic clam Macoma balthica(Bivalvia: Tellinidae): setting the stage for studying mito-nuclear incompatibilities
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, December 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12862-014-0259-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alice Saunier, Pascale Garcia, Vanessa Becquet, Nathalie Marsaud, Frédéric Escudié, Eric Pante

Abstract

BackgroundAllopatric divergence across lineages can lead to post-zygotic reproductive isolation upon secondary contact and disrupt coevolution between mitochondrial and nuclear genomes, promoting emergence of genetic incompatibilities. A previous F ST scan on the transcriptome of the Baltic clam Macoma balthica highlighted several genes potentially involved in mito-nuclear incompatibilities (MNIs). As proteins involved in the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHO) chain are prone to MNIs and can contribute to the maintenance of genetic barriers, the mitochondrial genomes of six Ma. balthica individuals spanning two secondary contact zones were sequenced using the Illumina MiSeq plateform.ResultsThe mitogenome has an approximate length of 16,806 bp and encodes 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNAs and 22 tRNAs, all located on the same strand. atp8, a gene long reported as rare in bivalves, was detected. It encodes 42 amino acids and is putatively expressed and functional. A large unassigned region was identified between rrnS and tRNA Met and could likely correspond to the Control Region. Replacement and synonymous mutations were mapped on the inferred secondary structure of all protein-coding genes of the OXPHO chain. The atp6 and atp8 genes were characterized by background levels of replacement mutations, relative to synonymous mutations. However, most nad genes (notably nad2 and nad5) were characterized by an elevated proportion of replacement mutations.ConclusionsSix nearly complete mitochondrial genomes were successfully assembled and annotated, providing the necessary roadmap to study MNIs at OXPHO loci. Few replacement mutations were mapped on mitochondrial-encoded ATP synthase subunits, which is in contrast with previous data on nuclear-encoded subunits. Conversely, the high population divergence and the prevalence of non-synonymous mutations at nad genes are congruent with previous observations from the nuclear transcriptome. This further suggest that MNIs between subunits of Complex I of the OXPHO chain, coding for NADH Dehydrogenase, may play a role in maintaining barriers to gene flow in Ma. balthica.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 35%
Student > Bachelor 6 19%
Student > Master 5 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 13%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 3%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 1 3%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 45%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 26%
Environmental Science 5 16%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 6%
Computer Science 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 September 2015.
All research outputs
#4,377,524
of 6,253,800 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1,377
of 1,660 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#120,483
of 193,178 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#56
of 66 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,253,800 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,660 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.7. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 66 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.