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CAGE-defined promoter regions of the genes implicated in Rett Syndrome

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, January 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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45 Mendeley
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Title
CAGE-defined promoter regions of the genes implicated in Rett Syndrome
Published in
BMC Genomics, January 2014
DOI 10.1186/1471-2164-15-1177
Pubmed ID
Authors

Morana Vitezic, Nicolas Bertin, Robin Andersson, Leonard Lipovich, Hideya Kawaji, Timo Lassmann, Albin Sandelin, Peter Heutink, Dan Goldowitz, Thomas Ha, Peter Zhang, Annarita Patrizi, Michela Fagiolini, Alistair RR Forrest, Piero Carninci, Alka Saxena

Abstract

Mutations in three functionally diverse genes cause Rett Syndrome. Although the functions of Forkhead box G1 (FOXG1), Methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) and Cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) have been studied individually, not much is known about their relation to each other with respect to expression levels and regulatory regions. Here we analyzed data from hundreds of mouse and human samples included in the FANTOM5 project, to identify transcript initiation sites, expression levels, expression correlations and regulatory regions of the three genes RESULTS: Our investigations reveal the predominantly used transcription start sites (TSSs) for each gene including novel transcription start sites for FOXG1. We show that FOXG1 expression is poorly correlated with the expression of MECP2 and CDKL5. We identify promoter shapes for each TSS, the predicted location of enhancers for each gene and the common transcription factors likely to regulate the three genes. Our data imply Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) mediated silencing of Foxg1 in cerebellum CONCLUSIONS: Our analyses provide a comprehensive picture of the regulatory regions of the three genes involved in Rett Syndrome.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Denmark 1 2%
France 1 2%
Unknown 41 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 22%
Student > Master 9 20%
Researcher 7 16%
Other 5 11%
Student > Bachelor 5 11%
Other 7 16%
Unknown 2 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 36%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 11%
Neuroscience 4 9%
Physics and Astronomy 2 4%
Other 7 16%
Unknown 5 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 December 2014.
All research outputs
#991,235
of 4,691,823 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#1,049
of 4,322 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#39,355
of 155,499 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#71
of 302 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,691,823 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 78th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,322 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 155,499 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 302 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.