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Thromboelastometry and organ failure in trauma patients: a prospective cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in Critical Care, December 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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10 tweeters

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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51 Mendeley
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Title
Thromboelastometry and organ failure in trauma patients: a prospective cohort study
Published in
Critical Care, December 2014
DOI 10.1186/s13054-014-0687-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marcella CA Müller, Kirsten Balvers, Jan M Binnekade, Nicola Curry, Simon Stanworth, Christine Gaarder, Knut M Kolstadbraaten, Claire Rourke, Karim Brohi, J Carel Goslings, Nicole P Juffermans

Abstract

IntroductionData on the incidence of a hypercoagulable state in trauma, as measured by thromboelastometry (ROTEM), is limited and the prognostic value of hypercoagulability after trauma on outcome is unclear. We aimed to determine the incidence of hypercoagulability after trauma, and to assess whether early hypercoagulability has prognostic value on the occurrence of multiple organ failure (MOF) and mortality.MethodsThis was a prospective observational cohort study in trauma patients who met highest trauma level team activation. Hypercoagulability was defined as a G value of ¿11.7 dynes/cm2 and hypocoagulability as a G value of <5.0 dynes/cm2. ROTEM was performed on admission and 24 hours later.ResultsA total of 1010 patients were enrolled and 948 patients were analyzed. Median age was 38 (interquartile range (IQR) 26 to 53), 77% were male and median injury severity score was 13 (IQR 8 to 25). On admission, 7% of the patients were hypercoagulable and 8% were hypocoagulable. Altogether, 10% of patients showed hypercoagulability within the first 24 hours of trauma. Hypocoagulability, but not hypercoagulability, was associated with higher sequential organ failure assessment scores, indicating more severe MOF. Mortality in patients with hypercoagulability was 0%, compared to 7% in normocoagulable and 24% in hypocoagulable patients (P <0.001). EXTEM CT, alpha and G were predictors for occurrence of MOF and mortality.ConclusionThe incidence of a hypercoagulable state after trauma is 10% up to 24 hours after admission, which is broadly comparable to the rate of hypocoagulability. Further work in larger studies should define the clinical consequences of identifying hypercoagulability and a possible role for very early, targeted use of anticoagulants.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Colombia 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 48 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 18%
Student > Master 8 16%
Other 6 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 8%
Researcher 4 8%
Other 14 27%
Unknown 6 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 36 71%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 6%
Computer Science 1 2%
Arts and Humanities 1 2%
Social Sciences 1 2%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 7 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 January 2015.
All research outputs
#982,066
of 5,036,026 outputs
Outputs from Critical Care
#919
of 2,698 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#39,257
of 177,427 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Care
#78
of 157 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,036,026 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,698 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 177,427 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 157 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.