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Chronic Kidney Disease in Congenital Heart Disease Patients: A Narrative Review of Evidence

Overview of attention for article published in Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease, August 2015
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2 tweeters

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Title
Chronic Kidney Disease in Congenital Heart Disease Patients: A Narrative Review of Evidence
Published in
Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40697-015-0063-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Catherine Morgan, Mohammed Al-Aklabi, Gonzalo Garcia Guerra

Abstract

Patients with congenital heart disease have a number of risk factors for the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD). It is well known that CKD has a large negative impact on health outcomes. It is important therefore to consider that patients with congenital heart disease represent a population in whom long-term primary and secondary prevention strategies to reduce CKD occurrence and progression could be instituted and significantly change outcomes. There are currently no clear guidelines for clinicians in terms of renal assessment in the long-term follow up of patients with congenital heart disease. Consolidation of knowledge is critical for generating such guidelines, and hence is the purpose of this view. This review will summarize current knowledge related to CKD in patients with congenital heart disease, to highlight important work that has been done to date and set the stage for further investigation, development of prevention strategies, and re-evaluation of appropriate renal follow-up in patients with congenital heart disease. The literature search was conducted using PubMed and Google Scholar. Current epidemiological evidence suggests that CKD occurs in patients with congenital heart disease at a higher frequency than the general population and is detectable early in follow-up (i.e. during childhood). Best evidence suggests that approximately 30 to 50 % of adult patients with congenital heart disease have significantly impaired renal function. The risk of CKD is higher with cyanotic congenital heart disease but it is also present with non-cyanotic congenital heart disease. Although significant knowledge gaps exist, the sum of the data suggests that patients with congenital heart disease should be followed from an early age for the development of CKD. There is an opportunity to mitigate CKD progression and negative renal outcomes by instituting interventions such as stringent blood pressure control and reduction of proteinuria. There is a need to invest time, thought and money to fill existing knowledge gaps to improve health outcomes in this population. This review should serve as an impetus for generation of follow-up guidelines of kidney health evaluation in patients with congenital heart disease.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 46 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 8 17%
Student > Master 8 17%
Researcher 6 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 11%
Student > Postgraduate 5 11%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 10 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 23 50%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 2%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 13 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 July 2020.
All research outputs
#11,761,548
of 18,090,383 outputs
Outputs from Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease
#318
of 401 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#244,417
of 420,411 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease
#38
of 55 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,090,383 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 401 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 420,411 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 55 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.