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Yale school of public health symposium on lifetime exposures and human health: the exposome; summary and future reflections

Overview of attention for article published in Human Genomics, December 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#43 of 404)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
15 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
17 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
56 Mendeley
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Title
Yale school of public health symposium on lifetime exposures and human health: the exposome; summary and future reflections
Published in
Human Genomics, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40246-017-0128-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Caroline H. Johnson, Toby J. Athersuch, Gwen W. Collman, Suraj Dhungana, David F. Grant, Dean P. Jones, Chirag J. Patel, Vasilis Vasiliou

Abstract

The exposome is defined as "the totality of environmental exposures encountered from birth to death" and was developed to address the need for comprehensive environmental exposure assessment to better understand disease etiology. Due to the complexity of the exposome, significant efforts have been made to develop technologies for longitudinal, internal and external exposure monitoring, and bioinformatics to integrate and analyze datasets generated. Our objectives were to bring together leaders in the field of exposomics, at a recent Symposium on "Lifetime Exposures and Human Health: The Exposome," held at Yale School of Public Health. Our aim was to highlight the most recent technological advancements for measurement of the exposome, bioinformatics development, current limitations, and future needs in environmental health. In the discussions, an emphasis was placed on moving away from a one-chemical one-health outcome model toward a new paradigm of monitoring the totality of exposures that individuals may experience over their lifetime. This is critical to better understand the underlying biological impact on human health, particularly during windows of susceptibility. Recent advancements in metabolomics and bioinformatics are driving the field forward in biomonitoring and understanding the biological impact, and the technological and logistical challenges involved in the analyses were highlighted. In conclusion, further developments and support are needed for large-scale biomonitoring and management of big data, standardization for exposure and data analyses, bioinformatics tools for co-exposure or mixture analyses, and methods for data sharing.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 56 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 16%
Student > Bachelor 6 11%
Professor 5 9%
Student > Master 4 7%
Other 9 16%
Unknown 12 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 7%
Computer Science 3 5%
Environmental Science 3 5%
Other 16 29%
Unknown 13 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 February 2018.
All research outputs
#1,800,454
of 20,285,536 outputs
Outputs from Human Genomics
#43
of 404 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#53,273
of 435,877 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Human Genomics
#5
of 28 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,285,536 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 404 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 435,877 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 28 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.