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Potential diagnostic markers of olanzapine efficiency for acute psychosis: a focus on peripheral biogenic amines

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, December 2017
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Title
Potential diagnostic markers of olanzapine efficiency for acute psychosis: a focus on peripheral biogenic amines
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12888-017-1562-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

A. E. Taraskina, R. F. Nasyrova, A. M. Zabotina, D. N. Sosin, К. А. Sosina, E. E. Ershov, M. N. Grunina, E. M. Krupitsky

Abstract

Biomarkers are now widely used in many fields of medicine, and the identification of biomarkers that predict antipsychotic efficacy and adverse reactions is a growing area of psychiatric research. Monoamine molecules of the peripheral bloodstream are possible prospective biomarkers based on a growing body of evidence indicating that they may reflect specific changes in neurotransmitters in the brain. The aim of this study was to detect peripheral biogenic amine indicators of patients with acute psychosis and to test the correlations between the biological measures studied and the psychopathological status of the patients. This research included 60 patients with acute psychosis treated with olanzapine (n = 30) or haloperidol (n = 30). Here, we measured biogenic amine indicators, including mRNA levels of dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) and the serotonin 2A receptor (5HTR2A), in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and serum dopamine concentrations by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Psychopathological status was evaluated using psychometric scales. The assessments were conducted prior to and after 14 and 28 days of treatment. The administration of haloperidol, but not olanzapine, up-regulated 5HTR2A mRNA in a linear manner, albeit without statistical significance (p = 0.052). Both drugs had non-significant effects on DRD4 mRNA levels. Nevertheless, a positive correlation was found between DRD4 and 5HTR2A mRNA levels over a longitudinal trajectory, suggesting co-expression of the two genes. A significant positive correlation was observed between 5HTR2A mRNA levels and total Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) scores in both groups of patients before treatment. A significant correlation between baseline 5HTR2A mRNA levels and PANSS scores on days 14 and 28 of treatment remained for patients treated with olanzapine only. Moreover, a significant positive correlation was observed between blood serum dopamine levels and scores on extrapyramidal symptom scales in the olanzapine group. The DRD4 and 5HTR2A genes are co-expressed in PBMCs during antipsychotic administration. Despite a correlation between the studied biogenic amine indicators and the psychopathological status of patients, reliable biomarkers of treatment response could not be determined.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 56 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 14%
Student > Bachelor 7 13%
Other 6 11%
Researcher 3 5%
Other 6 11%
Unknown 13 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 25%
Neuroscience 9 16%
Psychology 7 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 5%
Other 6 11%
Unknown 14 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 December 2017.
All research outputs
#9,807,056
of 12,276,356 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#2,346
of 2,831 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#245,881
of 344,323 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#72
of 97 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,276,356 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,831 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.7. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 97 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.