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Population-based prevalence survey of follicular trachoma and trachomatous trichiasis in the Casamance region of Senegal

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, July 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
78 Mendeley
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Title
Population-based prevalence survey of follicular trachoma and trachomatous trichiasis in the Casamance region of Senegal
Published in
BMC Public Health, July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12889-017-4605-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Emma M. Harding-Esch, Julbert Kadimpeul, Boubacar Sarr, Awa Sane, Souleymane Badji, Mass Laye, Ansumana Sillah, Sarah E. Burr, David MacLeod, Anna R. Last, Martin J. Holland, David C. Mabey, Robin L. Bailey

Abstract

Trachoma, caused by ocular infection with Chlamydia trachomatis, is the leading infectious cause of blindness worldwide. We conducted the first population-based trachoma prevalence survey in the Casamance region of Senegal to enable the Senegalese National Eye Care Programme (NECP) to plan its trachoma control activities. The World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines state that any individual with trachomatous trichiasis (TT) should be offered surgery, but that surgery should be prioritised where the prevalence is >0.1%, and that districts and communities with a trachomatous inflammation, follicular (TF) prevalence of ≥10% in 1-9 year-olds should receive mass antibiotic treatment annually for a minimum of three years, along with hygiene promotion and environmental improvement, before re-assessing the prevalence to determine whether treatment can be discontinued (when TF prevalence in 1-9 year-olds falls <5%). Local healthcare workers conducted a population-based household survey in four districts of the Bignona Department of Casamance region to estimate the prevalence of TF in 1-9 year-olds, and TT in ≥15 year-olds. Children's facial cleanliness (ocular and/or nasal discharge, dirt on the face, flies on the face) was measured at time of examination. Risk factor questionnaires were completed at the household level. Sixty communities participated with a total censused population of 5580 individuals. The cluster-, age- and sex-adjusted estimated prevalence of TF in 1-9 year-olds was 2.5% (95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.8-3.6) (38/1425) at the regional level and <5% in all districts, although the upper 95%CI exceeded 5% in all but one district. The prevalence of TT in those aged ≥15 years was estimated to be 1.4% (95%CI 1.0-1.9) (40/2744) at the regional level and >1% in all districts. With a prevalence <5%, TF does not appear to be a significant public health problem in this region. However, TF monitoring and surveillance at sub-district level will be required to ensure that elimination targets are sustained and that TF does not re-emerge as a public health problem. TT surgery remains the priority for trachoma elimination efforts in the region, with an estimated 1819 TT surgeries to conduct.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 78 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 78 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 17%
Researcher 8 10%
Student > Bachelor 7 9%
Lecturer 6 8%
Student > Postgraduate 6 8%
Other 14 18%
Unknown 24 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 15%
Social Sciences 6 8%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 4 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 3%
Other 14 18%
Unknown 24 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 December 2017.
All research outputs
#1,873,687
of 12,287,089 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#2,250
of 8,316 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#74,953
of 344,793 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#92
of 272 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,287,089 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,316 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 344,793 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 272 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.